Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" They say, miracles are past; and we -have our philosophical persons, to make modern and familiar things, supernatural and causeless. Hence is it, that we make trifles of terrors; ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we should submit ourselves... "
The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson, George ... - Page 132
by William Shakespeare - 1807
Full view - About this book

Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1847
...KING'S Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU, and PAROIAES. Laf. They say, miracles are past ; and we Ьате ensconcinj ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we shoubl submit ourselves to an unknown fear. Par....
Full view - About this book

An Inquiry Into the Philosophy and Religion of Shakspere

William John Birch - Religion in literature - 1848 - 547 pages
...Lafeu a miracle, which is to be ascribed to heaven, and for which heaven is to be thanked : — Lajeu. They say, miracles are past; and we have our philosophical...when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear. It is impossible to suppose that Shakspere did not intend to convey in this speech a satire upon religion,...
Full view - About this book

Sketch of the life of Shakespeare. Tempest. Two Gentlemen of Verona. Merry ...

William Shakespeare - 1848
...///.—Paris. A room in the King's Palace. Enter Bertram, Lafeu, ana' ParoUes. Laf. They say. miracle* are past ; and we have our philosophical persons,...seeming knowledge, when we should submit ourselves lo an unknown fear.1 Par. Why, 'tis the raresl argument of wonder, thai hath shot out in our latter...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of W. Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1849 - 925 pages
...Enter BERTRAM, LIFEC, and PAROLLEB. Laf. They say, miracles are past ; and we have our philoDophical Shakespear «Ordinary. Ber. And so 'tis. Laf. To be relinquished of the artists, Par. So I say ; both of Galen...
Full view - About this book

The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1850
...fruitfully ; I am there before my legs. Count. Haste you again. [Exeunt severally. SCENE III. Paris. A Room in the King's Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU,...knowledge, when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear.2 Par. Why, 'tis the rarest argument of wonder, that hath shot out in our latter times. Her. And...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare...: Embracing a Life of ..., Issue 2

William Shakespeare - 1850
...fruitfully ; I am there before my legs. Count. Haste you again. [Exeunt severally. SCENE III. Paris. A Room in the King's Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU,...knowledge, when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear.2 Par. Why, 'tis the rarest argument of wonder, that hath shot out in our latter times. Ber. And...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare...: Embracing a Life of ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1850
...fruitfully ; I am there before my legs. Count. Haste you again. [Exeunt severally. SCENE III. Paris. A Room in the King's Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU,...past ; and we have our philosophical persons, to make modern1 and familiar things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it, that we make trilles of terrors...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Midsummer night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare - 1850 - 38 pages
...fruitfully ; I am there before my legs. Count. Haste you again. \_Exeunt severally. SCENE III. Paris. A Room in the King's Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU,...past ; and we have our philosophical persons, to make modern1 and familiar things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it, that we make trifles of terrors...
Full view - About this book

The Haileybury observer, Volume 6

East India college - 1850
...unrevealed and mysterious workings in Nature, by which mankind are guided and ruled. For Shakspere says, "They say, miracles are past; and we have our philosophical...familiar things supernatural and causeless. Hence it is that we make trifles of terrors ; ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we should...
Full view - About this book

The comedies, histories, tragedies and poems of William Shakspere ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...means, — an end to this trifling; now to your business. SCENE III.— Paris. A Boom in the Kingt Palace. Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU, and PAROLLES. LAF. They...should submit ourselves to an unknown fear. PAR. Why, 't is the rarest argument of wonder that hath shot out in our latter times. BER. And so 't is. LAF....
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF