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" Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp. Is it night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth intomb, When living light should kiss it ? Old M. 'Tis unnatural,... "
Specimens of Greek and Latin verse: chiefly translations - Page 70
by Charles Rann Kennedy - 1853 - 154 pages
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A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: Macbeth. 1873

William Shakespeare - 1873
...sense, as here: ' A piece of knowledge." It means ' knowledge ' or ' experience' in Cymb., II, iii, 102. Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp: Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When living...
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - English drama - 1871 - 110 pages
...206-209, ed. 1577.) The sentence last quoted is clearly the origin of what Ross says in act ii. scene 4: ' By the clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp,' &c. The other natural portents mentioned in the same scene are borrowed from Holinshed's account of...
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 1872
...'t is day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp : Is't night's predominance, or the da/s shame, That darkness does the face of earth intomb, When living light should kiss it ? OLD M. 'T is unnatural, 10 Even like the deed that's done. On Tuesday last, A falcon, tow'ring in her pride...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1872
...Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp; Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When living light should kiss it? Ross. Ah, good father, Old If. 'Tis unnatural, Even like...
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A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: Macbeth. 1873

William Shakespeare - 1873
...sense, as here : ' A piece of knowledge.' It means ' knowledge' or 'experience' in Cymb., II, iii, 102. Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp: Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When living...
Full view - About this book

Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 1873
...206-209, ed. 1577.) The sentence last quoted is clearly the origin of what Ross says in act ii. scene 4: ' By the clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp,' &c. The other natural portents mentioned in the same scene are borrowed from Holinshed's account of...
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Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth: As Produced by Edwin Booth

William Shakespeare - 1874 - 80 pages
...trifled former knowings. Ross. Ah, good father, Thou seest,the heavens, as troubled with man's afl, Threaten his bloody stage : by the clock 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp : Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When...
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Poetical Quotations from Chaucer to Tennyson: With Copious Indexes ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1875 - 772 pages
...SHAKSPEARE. Steed threatens steed in high and boastful neighs, Piercing the night's dull ear. Is ' t night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb ? SHAKSPEARE. Yon light is not daylight, I know it well: It is some meteor that the sun exhales,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1875
...his bloody stage : by th' clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp : Is't night's predominance, or the day's shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When living light should kiss it * ? Old M. 'Tis unnatural, Even like the deed that's done....
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 1876 - 180 pages
...g d. 1577.) The sentence last quoted is clearly the origin of what Ross says in act ii. scene 4: ' By the clock, 'tis day, And yet dark night strangles the travelling lamp,' &c. The other natural portents mentioned in the same scene are borrowed from Holinshed's account of...
Full view - About this book




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