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" Birone they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal. His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest... "
THE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE - Page 367
by RICHARD GRANT WHITE - 1863
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The New Grant White Shakespeare: Love's labour's lost ; A midsummer night's ...

William Shakespeare - 1912
...knowing ill, For he hath wit to make an ill shape good, And shape to win grace though he had no wit. 60 I saw him at the Duke Alencon's once ; And much too...his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch, 70 The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in...
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Heroes and Heroines of Fiction: Modern Prose and Poetry; Famous Characters ...

William S. Walsh - Literature - 1914 - 391 pages
...to the English knowledge of his character (Sidney Lee). Rosaline's description of Biron is famous: A merrier man. Within the limit of becoming mirth,...talk withal. His eye begets occasion for his wit. Which his fair tongue (conceits expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words. That aged ears...
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More Wanderings in London

Edward Verrall Lucas - London (England) - 1916 - 331 pages
...the limit of becDming minh, I never spent an hour's talk withaL His eye begets occasion for his wh ; For every object that the one doth catch The other...expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, miration could produce, had this day, for the first time since his death, a select party of his friends...
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Love's Labour's Lost

William Shakespeare - Courts and courtiers - 1917 - 238 pages
...students at that time Was there with him, as 1^ have heard a_truth. Biron they call him ; but a merrfer man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent...his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch 70 The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue, con£eiL's expositor, Delivers in...
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Robert J. Burdette: His Message

Robert Jones Burdette - 1922 - 460 pages
...his tongue is the clapper; for what his heart thinks, his tongue speaks." — Much Ado About Nothing. "His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth loving jest." — Love's Labor Lost. After two pages of such flattering comment from Shakespeare,...
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The Works of Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1906
...placed with a capital apte to keepe . . . like over sharpe V. His Shape would win grace, even Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit...his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch 70 The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in...
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Proceedings ..., Volume 41

New York State Bar Association - Bar associations - 1918
...an empire over the hearts of men. It might truly have been said of him in Shakespeare's phrase : " His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth loving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words...
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Love's Labour's Lost

William Shakespeare - Courts and courtiers - 1962 - 213 pages
...limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk witha1. His eye begets occasion for his wit, 70 For every object that the one doth catch. The other...mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue— conceit's expositorDelivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger...
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Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy

Leo Salingar - Drama - 1976 - 368 pages
...comedy from festivity ; witness Bartholomew Fair. In Love's Lahour's Lost Rosaline says of Berowne that His eye begets occasion for his wit, For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-loving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words...
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Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam, William Shakespeare - Drama - 1984 - 339 pages
...admiration of their speech (and Berowne's in particular) as a resplendent 'key of conceptions': Ros. His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object...expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words. (2. 1. 69ff.) And the pedants, naturally, invest all their efforts in the elaboration of verba as a...
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