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" The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues. "
The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson, George ... - Page 177
by William Shakespeare - 1807
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1810
...Lord. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! the great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. — Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Ser. He met the duke...
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Merchant of Venice. As you like it. All's well that ends well. Taming of the ...

William Shakespeare - 1811
...Lord. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! The great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if oar faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1813
...2 Lord. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears! The great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...cherish'd by our virtues. — Enter a Servant. How now? wheie's your master? Serv. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1810
...Lord. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! the great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. — únter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Ser. He met the duke...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: In Twenty-one Volumes, with the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1813
...LORD. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! The great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...be proud, if our faults whipped them not ; and our sc. in. THAT ENDS WELL. 351 crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. — Enter...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ...

Noah Webster - Elocution - 1814 - 230 pages
...follow my own teaching. 15. Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water. 16. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. VIII. 1. THE sense of death is most in apprehension j - . -And the poor beetle...
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Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - English drama (Comedy) - 1872 - 196 pages
...unhopeful mastery; and he takes care to provide, withal, the canon whereby he would have him judged: " The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipp'd them not ; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues." A pregnant...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1817
...Lord. And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! The great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...— Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Ser. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave ; his lordship will...
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1818
...Lord, And how mightily, some other times, we drown our gain in tears ! The great dignity, that his valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...— Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Serw. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave ; his lordship will...
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A View of the English Stage: Or, A Series of Dramatic Criticisms

William Hazlitt - Acting - 1818 - 461 pages
...Shakespeare which should be j stuck as a label in the mouths of our beadles and \ whippers-in of morality: "The web of our life is of a. mingled yarn, good and...proud if our faults whipped them not : and our crimes j would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues." : With respect to the extravagance of actors,...
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