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" Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests; in all time,— Calm or convulsed, in breeze or gale or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving — boundless, endless and sublime, The image of eternity, the throne Of the Invisible ; even... "
The works of lord Byron - Page 262
by George Gordon N. Byron (6th baron.) - 1820
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The American First Class Book: Or, Exercises in Reading and ..., Book 4

John Pierpont - Readers - 1835 - 480 pages
...where the Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests ; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark heaving ; — boundless, endless, and sublime — The image of Eternity — the throne Of the...
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Sketches of Society in Great Britain and Irleand, Volumes 1-2

Charles Samuel Stewart - Great Britain - 1835
...apostrophe of Byron my own — " And I have loved thee, Ocean! in all time, Calm or convulsed, in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark heaving — I have loved thee, And exulted in thy billows." SIGHT OF LAND. ' LETTER II. COASTING...
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The harp of the wilderness; or, Flowers of modern fugitive poetry

Harp - 1836
...— Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow — Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...in tempests ; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark -heaving ; — boundless, endless,...
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The Elocutionist: Consisting of Declamations and Readings in Prose and ...

Jonathan Barber - Oratory - 1836 - 392 pages
...play— Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow— Such as creation's dawn'beheld, thou rollest now. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...itself in tempests; in all time, (Calm or convulsed, in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving,)—boundless, endless,...
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The Works of George Byron: With His Letters and Journals, and His Life, Volume 8

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1836
...would be a noble subject for a poem."— Crater's Boswcll, vol. ill p. 400. — E.] CLXXXII. CLXXXIII. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...in tempests ; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving; — boundless, endless,...
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The Western Messenger, Volume 1

James Freeman Clarke, William Henry Channing, James Handasyd Perkins - Unitarianism - 1836
...sublime without adoration. Open the pages even of Byron. See what he says in his Apostrophe to the Ocean. "Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's Form Glasses...in tempests; in all time, Calm or convulsed, — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, on in the torrid clime, Dark-heaving; boundless, endless,...
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Childe Harold's pilgrimage, a romaunt

George Gordon N. Byron (6th baron.) - 1837
...Mediterranean ' would he a nohle suhject for a poem."— Life of Johnson, vol.vp 154. ed. CLxxxI. CLxxxni. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid elime Dark-heaving; — houndless, endless, and suhlime — The image of Eternity — the throne Of...
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History of the English Language and Literature

Robert Chambers - English language - 1837 - 328 pages
...— Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow — Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...in tempests; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving; — boundless, endless,...
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The Guernsey and Jersey Magazine, Volumes 3-4

1837
...intrudes By the deep sea, and music in its roar : and can we not address the ocean in the words of Byron ? Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses...in tempests, in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale or storm. Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Diirk-heaving: — boundless, endless,...
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Principles of elocution

William Graham (teacher of elocution.) - 1837
...varied in the inflexion is necessary in such passages, the wave of the voice not exceeding a half note. Thou glorious mirror ! where the Almighty's form Glasses...itself in tempests ; in all time, Calm or convulsed, in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole ; or, in the torrid clime, Dark heaving ; boundless, endless,...
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