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" And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along. Duch. Alas , poor Hi chard-! where rode he the whilst? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a- well-grac'd actor leaves the stage , Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 177
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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Contrast in Shakespeare's Historical Plays

Francis Meehan - Historical drama, English - 1915 - 118 pages
...Thinking his prattle to be tedious; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard; no man cried "God save him!" No joyful tongue...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. (V. ii.) Let us now turn to a consideration of a scene which is not only the most dramatic in this...
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Contrast in Shakespeare's Historical Plays

Francis Meehan - Historical drama, English - 1915 - 118 pages
...joyful tongue gave him his welcome home: Did scowl on gentle Richard; no man cried "God save him!" But dust was thrown upon his sacred head; Which with...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. (V. ii.) Let us now turn to a consideration of a scene which is not only the most dramatic in this...
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Fifteen Plays of Shakespeare: With a Glossary Abridged from the Oxford ...

William Shakespeare - 1916 - 1143 pages
...save him ; ' No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home ; But dust was thrown upon his sacred head, 30 Which with such gentle sorrow he shook off, His face...The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, 35 And barbarism itself have pitied him. But heaven hath a hand in these events, To whose high will...
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The Sounds of Spoken English with Specimen Passages in Phonetic ...

Walter Ripman - English language - 1920 - 384 pages
...actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : !8 Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did...patience — That had not God, for some strong purpose, steeled The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. SHAKESPEARE,...
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The Tragedy of King Richard the Second, Volume 19

William Shakespeare - 1921 - 149 pages
...head, Which with such gentle sorrow he shook off, His face still combating with tears and smiles, 32 The badges of his grief and patience, That had not...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. 36 .But heaven hath a hand in these events, V To whose high will we bound our calm contents. To Bolingbroke...
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The Man Shakespeare and His Tragic Life-story

Frank Harris - Dramatists, English - 1909 - 422 pages
...water. The whole play is summed up in York's pathetic description of Richard's entrance into London: " No man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him." This passage it seems to me both in manner and matter is as truly characteristic of Shakespeare as...
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Introduction. List of Dryden's works. Epistle dedicatory of the Rival ladies ...

John Dryden - 1926
...eyes Did scowl on Richard: no man cried, God save him No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, e But dust was thrown upon his sacred head, Which with...and patience), • That had not God (for some strong purppse) steel'd IO The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied...
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The Dramatist and the Received Idea

...offers a conspectus of the events of the play, our reaction to the summing up is extremely complex: . . .had not God for some strong purpose steel'd The hearts...pitied him. But heaven hath a hand in these events. . . v. ii. 34 For we know that York too hath had a hand in these events, and this is half pious rationalisation....
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King Richard the Second

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1981 - 282 pages
...Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried ' God save him!' No joyful tongue...patience, That had not God for some strong purpose steeled The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. But...
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Commentaries on the Historical Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 1

Thomas Peregrine Courtenay - Drama - 1840 - 344 pages
...? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, * Stow, 322. Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him." In a later scene,* the poet has a further improvement of his idea of the horse. " Groom. O, how it...
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