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" And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along. Duch. Alas , poor Hi chard-! where rode he the whilst? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a- well-grac'd actor leaves the stage , Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 177
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1850
...; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried God save himl No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home; But dust...melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. But heav'n hath a hand in those events ; To whose high will we bound our calm contents. Richard If. xi....
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 345 pages
...thus still doing, thus he pass'd along. Duch. Alas, poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. VIOLETS. Who are the violets now, That strew the green lap of the new-come spring? A SOLILOQUY IN PRISON....
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The comedies, histories, tragedies and poems of William Shakspere ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...whilst? YORK. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly Lent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be...these events ; To whose high will we bound our calm contenta. To Bolingbroke are we sworn subjects now, Whose state and honour I for aye allow. Enter AUMERLE....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...patience, — That had not God, for some strong purpose, steeled The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. But...
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Wanderings in North Wales: A Road and Railway Guide-book : Comprising ...

William Cathrall - Wales, North - 1851 - 264 pages
...— of the transient state of human greatness, and the still more transient nature of human favour. ' Men's eyes Did scowl on Richard : no man cried —...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him.' " With regard to the foundation of Flint Castle, antiquarians are to this day undecided. Camdeu and...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eves Did scowl on Eichard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave...patience, — That had- not God, for some strong purpose, steePd The hearts of men, they must perforce, have melted. , And barbarism itself have pitied him....
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A collection of printed papers relating to Durham school made by H. Holden ...

Durham city, sch - 1852
...«at Pí^apSov, §игг/и.о'( are'piuî /ib< ow, VT^3XflT€V eTUyVOM« tTÔÇ Т« SfíflOfflV 18 No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home : But dust...patience, — That had not God, for some strong purpose, stcel'd The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. But...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 167, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1853
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while 1 York. As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, Alter a well-graced night H% / steeled The hearts of men, they must perforce have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. But...
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1853 - 504 pages
...to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cry'd, God save him: No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. Richard II. Act V. Sc. V. Northumberland. How doth my son and brother 1 Thou tremblest, and the whiteness...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 345 pages
...be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried.God save him; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home:...have melted, And barbarism itself have pitied him. VIOLETS. Who are the violets now, That strew the green lap of the new-come spring? A SOt.ILOilUY IN...
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