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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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Essais littéraires sur Shakspeare; ou, Analyse raisonnée, scène ..., Volume 2

Paul Duport - 1828
...s'écrie, en mourant des rigueurs de sa belle : (i) Too old , by heaven; let still thé woman take Au elder than herself; so wears she to him , So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, howcver \ve do praise ourselves , Our fancies are more giddy and urifirm , More longing,...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 8

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...blazed youth, Becomes assuaged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld. Shalupeare. Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. Id. Our elderi say, The barren, touched iu this holy chase. Shake off their steril curse. id. We will...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
...What years, i'fiilh ? Via. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart ; Kor, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831 - 504 pages
...What years, i'faith? Kto. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the wonmir take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart ; For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirin, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, with Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831
...What years. i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still ihr woman ; which will bare matter to rehearse, though credit be asleep, and not an ear open : He wa For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies aro more giddy and unfírm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831
...your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the womar take An elder than herself; »o wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart ; For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and nnfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...What years, i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven; Let still the woman For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1836
...What years, i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the woman For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are moro giddy and uufirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...thorn, Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness. 7 — i. 1. 414 The same. Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. . . . • . However we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unflrm, More longing-, wavering,...
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Sketches of the Life and Genius of Shakspeare ...

David Paul Brown - 1838 - 62 pages
...so perfectly consonant with nature expressed in his Play of The Twelfth Night. Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For howsoever we do praise ourselves Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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