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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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William Shakspere: A Biography, Book 2

Charles Knight - 1843 - 542 pages
...the poet should make the Duke dramatically exclaim, — " Too old, by Heaven ! Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart." And wherefore ? — " For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm,...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1844
...of the Duke to Viola , in " Twelfth Night," (Act II. sc. iv.) where he says, " Let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him ; So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise onrselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm , More longing, wavering,...
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A Love Gift for ...

Love poetry - 1841
...years, i' faith 1 Viola. — About your years, my lord. Duke.— Too old, by heaven; Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Old Hall, Or, Our Hearth and Homestead, Volume 3

John Mills - 1845
...hunt — and I didn't live to be mistaken.' CHAPTER IX. " Too old. by Heaven : let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him. So sways she level in her husband's heart." " MRS. FRANCIS JAMES JONES sat in the breakfast parlour of Franca Villa, in a gloomy disconsolate mood....
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Self, by the author of 'Cecil'.

Catherine Grace F. Gore - 1845
...well-disciplined family, they were to spend the autumn at Weymouth. SELF CHAPTER IV. Let still the woman take An elder than herself. So wears she to him •, So sways the level in her husband's heart. SHAKSPKARK. Omnes ut tec-urn mentis pro talibus annos Eiigat, et...
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Comedies. Two gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare - 1847
...What years, i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. Let still the wonua sure, then, in the message? Beat. Yea, just so much as you may take upon a knife's point, a For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1847
...What years, i' faith ? Via. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman o Uk JH , : For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Dramatic Works and Poems, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1847
...What years, i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she love! in her husband's heart. For, hoy, however we do ¡»raise ourselves, Our fancies arc more giddy...
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Sketch of the life of Shakespeare. Tempest. Two Gentlemen of Verona. Merry ...

William Shakespeare - 1848
...years, i'faith ? Via. About your years, my lord. I'-l.-i. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the worn ar take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart ; For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Shakespeare Proverbs: Or, The Wise Saws of Our Wisest Poet Collected Into a ...

William Shakespeare, Mary Cowden Clarke - 1848 - 145 pages
...their time. Let us not burden our remembrances \) With a heaviness that 's gone. \ Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him. So sways she level in her husband's heart. Love is like a child, That longs for every thing that he can come by. Love sought is good, but given...
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