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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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Notes from life, in six essays

sir Henry Taylor - 1848
...point of seniority, let us listen to the Duke and Viola — Duke. " Let still the woman take An older than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works of W. Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1849 - 925 pages
...What years, i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven; Let still the woman om me, which I would have stopp'd; But I had not so much of man in me, But all my mother c For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Apophthegms from the plays of Shakespeare, by C. Lyndon

William Shakespeare - 1850
...eye-offending brine.. Vol. a. I sl Lady, you are the cruellest she alive.. Viola a. 1 s. 5 Let still a woman, take an elder than herself; so wears she to him, so sways she level in her husband's heart.. Duke a. 2 s. 4 Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.. .. Olivia a. 3 *. 1 Let there be...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE

1850
...What years, i'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven : Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him. So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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De Quincey's Writings, Volume 2

Thomas De Quincey - 1850
...years ? Viola. 1' faith, About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. I^et still the woman lake An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Cup and the Lip: A Novel, Volume 1

Mrs. Laura Jewry Valentine - 1851
...remember the passage I read from your favourite Shakespeare only last Saturday — " Let still the woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...then. What years, i' faith ? Via. Of your complexion. Duke. Too old, by heaven: Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm. More longing, wavering,...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 345 pages
...creature That is belov'd. THE WOMAN SHOULD BE YOUNGEST IN LOVE. Too old, by heaven; Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unlirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...A cut was a h.ir=e. Vio. About your years, my lord. DUKE. Too old, by heaven : Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...complexion. Duke. She is not worth thee, then. What years, i'faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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