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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...repetitions in songs. * Favour is often used for feature. Viola in her reply plays upon the word. H. An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Biographical Essays, Volume 1

Thomas De Quincey - 1851 - 288 pages
...About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman take An elder than herself: BO wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1852
...What years, 'faith? Via. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too Id, by heaven ; Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart, For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unarm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare, William Hazlitt - 1852
...What years, i' faith ? Via. About your years, my lord. DuTce. Too old, by heaven : Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unflrm. More longing, wavering,...
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The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
...What years i' faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart : For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our faneies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 884 pages
...What years i' faith? Via. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman his, Bassanio, The devil can cite scripture for his purpose. An evil soul, producing holy : For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...What years, 'faith ? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven ; Let still the womaf take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart ; For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are morc^iddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Christian Reformer, Or, Unitarian Magazine and Review, Volume 9

Unitarianism - 1853
...unhappy result of the conjuncture of unequal years where the wife is the older : " Let still the woman take An elder than herself. So wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart," c. F ..? have peace, I am obliged ever to be at war." Mr. Smith followed the submissive resignation...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 575 pages
...thorn, Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness. 7 — i. 1. 220. The same. Let still the woman take An elder than herself ; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. . . . . However we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...What years, 'faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. Duke. Too old, by heaven : let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unarm, More longing, wavering,...
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