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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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Twelfth Night, Or, What You Will

William Shakespeare - 1991 - 91 pages
...What years, i' faith? VIOLA. About your years, my lord. DUKE. Too old, by heaven : let still the woman take An elder than herself : so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart : For, boy, however We do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Comic Transformations in Shakespeare

Ruth Nevo - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 242 pages
...wife. The latter'schoice, 'About youryears, my Lord', would be Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman take An elder than herself, so wears she to him; So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Syracuse University

Steve Krakauer - Education - 2005 - 160 pages
..."What years, i'faith?" He even, vaguely, puts himself into a woman's situation: Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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William Shakespeare: A Compact Documentary Life

Samuel Schoenbaum, Distinguished Professor of Renaissance Literature and Director Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies S Schoenbaum - Biography & Autobiography - 1987 - 384 pages
...to young. And, more forcibly, the Duke in Twelfth Night to the disguised Viola: Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Shakespeare: Text, Subtext, and Context

Ronald L. Dotterer - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 234 pages
...gone unrewarded. In Twelfth Night, the Duke speaks thus to the disguised Viola: Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. . . . But the difficulty, of course, is that such passages occur in plays, not in autobiographical...
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Words of Wisdom

William Safire, Leonard Safir - Education - 1990 - 432 pages
...genetic structure of the family. —Jill Clayburgh 238 Marriage (Contemplation Of) Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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La dodicesima notte ovvero quel che volete

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1993 - 204 pages
...What years, i'faith ? VIOLA About your years, my lord. ORSINO Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him; So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and urifirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Twelfth Night

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - Drama - 2001 - 32 pages
...he advises that a youth should not marry an older woman. Orsino's advice . . . Let still the woman take An elder than herself, so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Testing KS3 English Skills and Practice Year 9

Ray Barker, Christine Moorcroft - English language - 2003 - 64 pages
...thee, then. What years, i' faith? About your years, my lord. Too old by heaven: let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Scene-speare! : Shakespearean Scenes for Student Actors

William Shakespeare, Lindsay Price, Theatrefolk - Acting - 2004 - 163 pages
...years, i' faith? VIOLA: About your years, my lord. ORSINO: Too old, by heaven. Let still the woman take An elder than herself, so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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