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" I COME no more to make you laugh; things now, That bear a weighty and a serious brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. "
The dramatic works of William Shakspeare - Page 106
by William Shakespeare - 1813
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The Life of Henry the Eighth, Volume 12

William Shakespeare - 1912 - 168 pages
...Scribes, Officers, Guards, and other Attendants. SCENE: London; Westminster; KimboUon.] Life of THE PROLOGUE I COME no more to make you laugh : things...to flow, We now present. Those that can pity, here 5 May, if they think it well, let fall a tear ; The subject will deserve it. Such as give Their money...
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Shakespeare: A Life in Drama

Stanley Wells - Drama - 1995 - 403 pages
...no violent action, no on-stage deaths, and little comedy; indeed, the Prologue's opening words are I come no more to make you laugh. Things now That...serious brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woeSuch noble scenes as draw the eye to flow We now present. Emphasizing that the play will present...
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Patterns and Perspectives in English Renaissance Drama

Eugene M. Waith - Literary Criticism - 1988 - 309 pages
...of exemplary history, the most heroic kind, the prologue emphasizes its concern with noble behavior: Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow. We now...well, let fall a tear: The subject will deserve it. (11. 4-7) The same might be said of many an Arthurian romance or of The Two Noble Kinsmen. Some of...
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Laughter, Pain, and Wonder: Shakespeare's Comedies and the Audience in the ...

David Richman - Drama - 1990 - 197 pages
...assured of his power to guide his audience's emotions is suggested by the Prologue to Henry VIII.2 I come no more to make you laugh; things now That...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. Be sad, as we would make ye. Think ye see The very persons of our noble story As they were living;...
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Du Fu's Laments from the South

David R. Mc Craw - Fiction - 1992 - 271 pages
...the thing"; it decisively influenced the later development of the Chinese yongwu. • 8 • Politics I come no more to make you laugh: things now That...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow We now present. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry Vlll POLITICS is the grand theme in Du Fu's oeuvre. In fact, it was a crucial...
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Shakespeare: A Life in Drama

Stanley Wells - Biography & Autobiography - 1997 - 416 pages
...no violent action, no on-stage deaths, and little comedy; indeed, the Prologue's opening words are I come no more to make you laugh. Things now That...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow We now present. Emphasizing that the play will present 'truth', he draws attention too to the exemplary nature of the...
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The Oxford Shakespeare: King Henry VIII: or All is True

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2008 - 240 pages
...servants, guards, attendants, common people King Henry VIII, or All is True Prologue Enter Prologue PROLOGUE I come no more to make you laugh . Things...to flow We now present . Those that can pity here 5 May, if they think it well, let fall a tear; The subject will deserve it. Such as give Their money...
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Shakespeare: The Evidence: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Man and His Work

Ian Wilson - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 512 pages
...best entertainment for royal wedding celebrations? The mood Shakespeare set is quite apparent from the Prologue: I come no more to make you laugh; things...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. ending, after an exhortation to 'Think ye see/ The very persons of our noble story' with the doom-laden:...
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The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor

Bruce R. Smith - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 386 pages
...to make you laugh." The emphasis instead falls on "woe," "noble," and "flow": Things now, That beare a Weighty, and a Serious Brow, Sad, high, and working,...Noble Scenes, as draw the Eye to flow We now present. The audience to Henry VIII are flattered as "gentle Hearers," indeed "The First and Happiest Hearers...
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Pragmatism and Other Writings

William James - Psychology - 2000 - 358 pages
...which I propose to give tonight cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, — / come no more to make you laugh; things now, That bear...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, — 2 must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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