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" Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ... - Page 335
edited by - 1804
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The Speaker; Or, Miscellaneous Pieces: Selected from the Best English ...

William Enfield - Elocution - 1827 - 346 pages
...should decline? — Nay, if you weep, I'm inll'ii indeed. Crom. How does yor Grace! WoL Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities ; A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur d me, I humbly thank his grace ; and, from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1828
...should decline'! Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace ahove all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Tin/ king has cur'd me, I humhly thank his...
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Studies in Poetry: Embracing Notices of the Lives and Writings of the Best ...

George Barrell Cheever - American poetry - 1830 - 480 pages
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor : O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom....
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1830
...your Grace ? rTolsey. Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and 1 feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities,...pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour. — Henry I III. act 3. jc. 6. Ulysses speaking of Hector : • I wonder now how yonder city stands,...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1831
...Cromwell. I know myself now ; and Г feel within m A peace above all earthly dignities, Aetilland quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly...pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour: U, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a. man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad,...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1831
...Л writ incurring a penalty. W<4 Why, well; Never ю truly happy, my food Cromwell. I know mvsel'f now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has eur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; anil from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out uf pity,...
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1833 - 504 pages
...Richard, II. Act I. Sc. 3. Cromwell. How does your Grace 1 Wolsey. Why, well; Never so truly nappy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within...of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. Henry VIII. Act III. Sc. 2. Ulysses speaking of Hector : I wonder now how yonder city stands,...
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The English Orator: a Selection of Pieces for Reading & Recitation

James Hedderwick - Oratory - 1833 - 216 pages
...should decline ? Nay, if you weep, I am fallen indeed ! Crom. How does your Grace ? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell ! I know myself...dignities — A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me — I humbly thank his Grace — and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity...
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Richard III. Henry VIII. Troilus and Cressida. Timon of Athens. Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - 1836
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Cram. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1836
...mun should decline? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crmn. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, wen ; Лаг. What if I do not ? оя, indeed, I do not ; Yet, for I know thou art religious, And stilt and quiet conscience. The king has curM me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
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