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" Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ... - Page 335
edited by - 1804
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The plays and poems of Shakespeare, according to the improved text ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1842
...feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Wol. I...
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Cram. How does your grace 1 Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour : O, 't is a burden, Cromwell, 't is a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1843
...man should decline? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well: Never so truly happy , my good Cromwell. I know myself...taken A load would sink a navy — too much honour. 0 ! 't is a burden , Cromwell , 't is a burden , Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1843
...should decline ' Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom, How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace ahove all earthly dignities ; A still and quiet conscience. The King has cured me, I humhly thank his...
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1844
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders. These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken...
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The District School Reader, Or, Exercises in Reading and Speaking: Designed ...

William Draper Swan - American literature - 1845 - 484 pages
...man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace? Wol. Why, will; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities — A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, — I humbly thank his grace, — and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of...
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The District School Reader, Or, Exercises in Reading and Speaking: Designed ...

William Draper Swan - American literature - 1845 - 484 pages
...man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace? Wol. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...peace above all earthly dignities — A still and qiet conscience. The king has cured me, — I humbly thank his grace, — and from these shoulders,...
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The rhetorical reader, consisting of choice specimens of oratorical ...

John Hall Hindmarsh - 1845 - 80 pages
...dec'line ? — Na'y, if you w'eep, I'm fallen inde'ed. Crom. How do'es your Grace ? Wol. Why, we 11 ; Never so tru'ly ha'ppy (my good Cro'mwell.) I know...myself no"w, and I feel with'in me (A pe'ace/ above all earfhly di'gnities) ; A st'ill, and quTet-conscience. The kin'g/ has cur'ed me ; I humbly tha'nk his...
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The Art of Elocution: From the Simple Articulation of the Elemental Sounds ...

George Vandenhoff - Elocution - 1846 - 383 pages
...decline ? Nay, an' you weep, I'm fallen indeed. Crom. — How does your grace? Wol.— Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Crom. — I'm glad your grace has made that right use of it To endure more miseries and greater far,...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: King Richard III ; King Henry VIII ...

William Shakespeare, Alexander Chalmers - Azerbaijan - 1847
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour : 0, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am...
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