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" Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ... - Page 335
edited by - 1804
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1850
...Can thy spirit wonder A great man should decline ? Crom — How does your Grace ? Wol — Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...pity taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour. Oh, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden Too heavy for a man that hopes for heav'n ! Go get thee...
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Apophthegms from the plays of Shakespeare, by C. Lyndon

William Shakespeare - 1850
...setting. I shall fall like a bright exhalation in the evening, and no man see me more.—WOL. III., 2. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ;...load would sink a navy, too much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven.—Wot. III., 2. I see your...
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The World's Childhood: A Series of Sunday Evening Sermons from ..., Volume 20

Louis Albert Banks - Bible - 1910 - 363 pages
...a moment ago, in "King Henry VIII," makes Cardinal Wolsey say to Cromwell, who asks him how he is: Never so truly happy, my good CromwelL I know myself...all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. But how caii a poor sinner accomplish the cure of his fear and shame and get victory over the sin that...
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The New Grant White Shakespeare: Henry VIII ; Troilus and Cressida

William Shakespeare - 1912
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fall'n indeed. Crom. How does your Grace ? Wol. Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The King has curM me, 380 I humbly thank his Grace, and from these shoulders, These ruinM pillars, out of pity,...
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The Life of Henry the Eighth

William Shakespeare - 1912 - 168 pages
...should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your Grace ? Wol. Why, well, Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The King has eur'd me, 80 I humbly thank his Grace; and from lilt-no shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity,...
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Chiefly theological

Augustus Hopkins Strong - Baptists - 1912
...human nature when he put into the mouth of Cardinal Wolsey, even when degraded by his king, the words : I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above...all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. But to know ourselves perfectly is impossible to men, apart from God's enlightenment. Paul will not...
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Things that Matter Most: Devotional Papers

John Henry Jowett - Devotional literature - 1913 - 281 pages
...servant of a quickened life. Let me read once more: CROMWELL: How does your grace? WOLSEY: Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. And so I say the snow is the minister in the development of the Lord's design. If we had no snow in...
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The Rudiments of Criticism

Edmund Arnold Greening Lamborn - Criticism - 1916 - 191 pages
...it is often learned by small boys as ' a Shakespearian gem '. Now, at line 374 enters Shakespeare : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; The verse-rhythm has ceased to be insistent ; it has sunk into subconsciousness ; to read the rest...
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A Handbook of Oral Reading

Lee Emerson Bassett - Elocution - 1917 - 353 pages
...decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Cromwell. How does your Grace ? Wolsey. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour. O, 't is a burden, Cromwell, 't is a burden Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven ! Cromwell. I am...
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A Handbook of Oral Reading

Lee Emerson Bassett - Elocution - 1917 - 353 pages
...decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Cromwell. How does your Grace ? Wolsey. Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour. 0, 't is a burden, Cromwell, 't is a burden Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven! Cromwell. I...
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