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" O mother, mother ! What have you done ? Behold, the heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother ! O ! You have won a happy victory to Rome : But, for your son, — believe it, O, believe it, Most dangerously... "
The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, with Notes, Original ... - Page 243
by William Shakespeare - 1831
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Hamlet and Other Shakespearean Essays

L. C. Knights, Lionel Charles Knights - Literary Criticism - 1979 - 308 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. But let it come. Here indeed, in each instance, is nobility and genuine pathos. Yet neither of these passages stands...
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Shakespeare's English and Roman History Plays: A Marxist Approach

Paul N. Siegel - Drama - 1986 - 168 pages
...doing so, he becomes a tragic scapegoat who consciously sacrifices himself to save Rome (5.3.187—89): "But, for your son, believe it, O, believe it,/ Most...prevail'd,/ If not most mortal to him. But let it come." Instead of being eternally dishonored as the destroyer of his country, he gains, as stated in the last...
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Shakespeare's Tragedies: An Introduction

Dieter Mehl - Drama - 1986 - 272 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...O, believe it, Most dangerously you have with him prevaiPd, If not most mortal to him. But let it come. (v.3. 182-9) Shakespeare makes the personal encounter...
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Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare's Plays ...

Janet Adelman - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 379 pages
...he embraces that death with a passivity thoroughly uncharacteristic of him: O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. But let it come. (5.3.185-89) Volumnia achieves this happy victory partly because she makes the dangers inherent in...
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Coriolanus on Stage in England and America, 1609-1994

John Ripley - Performing Arts - 1998 - 431 pages
...do ope, The gods look down, and smile in dismal wonder As at one forsworn. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. But, let it come. O Mother! Wife! [He buries his face in his hands then he walks closely towards the Corioli door, and...
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. (5.3.182-89) Coriolanus cannot defeat Volumnia, "tread ... on thy mother's womb" (5.3.123-24). In this...
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Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 139 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...it, O believe it! Most dangerously you have with him prevailed, 189 If not most mortal to him. But let it come. 190 Aufidius, though I cannot make true...
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Shakespeare's Noise

Kenneth Gross - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 282 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. But let it come. (182-89) There is something primal, even infantile suggested by the text's "O my mother, mother! O!"...
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The Tragedie of Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...tribunes, has given her her triumph. He holds her hand a moment before he speaks: 'O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But, for your...have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to him.' And Volumnia answers not a word; too well she knew that when she begged mercy for her country she devoted...
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Shakespeare and Machiavelli

John Alan Roe, Both Professors of Maths John Roe - Drama - 2002 - 218 pages
...heavens do ope, The gods look down, and this unnatural scene They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O! You have won a happy victory to Rome; But for your...have with him prevail'd, If not most mortal to him. (5.3.182-9) Whether we can extract from this a further lesson, such as the following, I rather doubt:...
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