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" H. Fielding has given a true picture of himself and his first wife in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted ; and I am persuaded several of the incidents he mentions are real matters of fact. "
Biographical Memoirs of Eminent Novelists, and Other Distinguished Persons - Page 112
by Walter Scott - 1834
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Letters from the Right Honourable Lady Mary Wortley Montagu 1709 to 1762

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu - English letters - 1906 - 551 pages
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife, in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted; and, I am...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels. All these sort of books have the same fault, which I cannot easily...
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The Life and Writings of Henry Fielding, Esq

Thomas Keightley - Authors, English - 1907 - 162 pages
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife, in the character of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted; and I am persuaded...the incidents he mentions are real matters of fact." Richardson also, in one of his letters, writes, "Amelia, even to her noselessness, is again his first...
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Fielding

Austin Dobson - Authors, English - 1907 - 218 pages
...to repeat that it is painted from Fielding's first wife, or to insist that, as Lady Mary was fully persuaded, " several of the incidents he mentions are real matters of fact." That famous scene where Amelia is spreading, for the recreant who is losing his money at the King's...
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The Scenery of Sherwood Forest: With an Account of Some Eminent People Once ...

Joseph Rodgers - Great Britain - 1908 - 445 pages
...of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted ; and I am persuaded, several ot the incidents he mentions are real matters of fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels. . . . Fielding has really a fund of true humour, and was to be pitied...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth,1 some compliments to his own figure ex1 In Amelia. cepted; and I am persuaded several of the incidents he mentions...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels. All these sort of books have the same fault, which I cannot easily...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1911 - 724 pages
...in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth,1 some compliments to his own figure ex1 In Amelia. cepted; and I am persuaded several of the incidents he mentions...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels. All these sort of books have the same fault, which I cannot easily...
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The History of Henry Fielding, Volume 2

Wilbur Lucius Cross - Authors, English - 1918
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife, in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted; and, I am...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels." Lady Mary, who liked her cousin, hardly meant to call him a sorry...
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The History of Henry Fielding, Volume 2

Wilbur Lucius Cross - 1918
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife, in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted; and, I am...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels." Lady Mary, who liked her cousin, hardly meant to call him a sorry...
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The Modern Student's Book of English Literature

Harry Morgan Ayres - English literature - 1924 - 898 pages
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being...how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge. Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels. All these sort of books have the same fault, which I cannot easily...
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The English Humourists of the Eighteenth Century and Charity and Humour

William Makepeace Thackeray - Literary Collections - 2007 - 283 pages
...has given a true picture of himself and his first wife in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted; and I am persuaded...fact. I wonder he does not perceive Tom Jones and Mr. Booth are sorry scoundrels — Fielding has really a fund of true humour, and was to be pitied...
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