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Books Books 91 - 100 of 123 on Withal, as large a charter as the wind, " To blow on whom I please ; for so fools....
" Withal, as large a charter as the wind, " To blow on whom I please ; for so fools have: " And they that are most galled with my folly, " They most must laugh.' "
The wanderer: or, A collection of original tales and essays - Page 99
by Charles Fothergill (of Salisbury.) - 1803
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Shakespeare's Plots: A Study in Dramatic Construction

William Hansell Fleming - Drama - 1901 - 467 pages
...their nature and function very fully and lucidly. Jaques, who was ambitious for a motley coat, says: I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please: seq. ' Viola thus describes the Clown in Twelfth Night; Tjiis fellow is wise enough to play the fool...
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Gentle Flame: The Life and Verse of Dudley, Fourth Lord North (1602-1677)

Dale B. J. Randall, Dudley North Baron North - Poetry - 1983 - 254 pages
...freedom in No. 49, II. II —12). The wind itself is a symbol of liberty; cf. Shakespeare's Jaques, “I must have liberty / Withal, as large a charter as the wind. . .“ (As You Like It, II.vii.47— 4 8). 1. 8 remora A sucking fish of the family Echeneididae, anciently...
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Gentle Flame: The Life and Verse of Dudley, Fourth Lord North (1602-1677)

Dale B. J. Randall, Dudley North Baron North - Poetry - 1983 - 254 pages
...discuss freedom in No. 49, 11. 11-12). The wind itself is a symbol of liberty; cf. Shakespeare's Jaques, "I must have liberty / Withal, as large a charter as the wind. .'." (As You Like It, II.vii.47-48). 1. 8 remora A sucking fish of the family Echeneididae, anciently...
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Shakespeare and the Poet's Life

Gary Schmidgall - Biography & Autobiography
...echoes Don John's demand for freedom—satiric license, rather—from the bonds of social decorum: “I must have liberty / Withal, as large a charter as the wind, I To blow on whom I please “(2.7.47-49). He also echoes the constitutional cynicism of the satirist...
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As You Like it

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1993 - 102 pages
...Provided that you weed your better judgments Of all opinion that grows rank in them That I am wise. I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as...wind, To blow on whom I please, for so fools have: They most must laugh: and why, sir, must they so? The 'why' is plain as way to parish church: He that...
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Four Comedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1994 - 678 pages
...story of Reynard the Fox) 'maxim* or 'comment') Of all opinion that grows rank in them That I am wise. I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as...are most galled with my folly They most must laugh. And why, sir, must they so? The why is plain as way to parish church. He that a fool doth very wisely...
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The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe

Charles Nicholl - History - 1992 - 413 pages
...eye over the 'fat greasy citizens', is Arden's satirist. He demands complete freedom of expression: I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as...have. And they that are most galled with my folly, To speak my mind, and I will through and through Cleanse the foul body of th' infected world. It is...
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Players of Shakespeare 2: Further Essays in Shakespearean Performance by ...

Royal Shakespeare Company - Drama - 1989 - 216 pages
...most humorous sadness. O that I were a fool! I am ambitious for a motley coat. It is my only suit. I must have liberty withal, as large a charter as...wind, to blow on whom I please, for so fools have. Give me leave to speak my mind and I will through and through cleanse the foul body of th'infected...
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Erotic Beasts and Social Monsters: Shakespeare, Jonson, and Comic Androgyny

Grace Tiffany - Drama - 1995 - 237 pages
...talking only to Jaques. He functions as both questioner and respondent in his solitary satiric diatribe: they that are most galled with my folly, They most must laugh. And why, sir, must they so? The way is plain as way to parish church. . . . Or what is he of basest...
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Love's Labour's Lost: Critical Essays

Felicia Hardison Londre, Felicia Hardison Londré - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 476 pages
...two and two together and made five—that was their own look-out. As Jaques puts it in a later play, I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as...on whom I please, for so fools have; And they that most are galled with my folly, They most must laugh; and why, sir, must they so? The ‘why” is plain...
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