Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Lest this declaration should disquiet the minds of our friends and fellow-subjects in any part of the empire, we assure them that we mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to... "
The Political Writings of John Dickinson, Esquire: Late President of the ... - Page 42
by John Dickinson - 1801
Full view - About this book

The Constitutional Convention and the Formation of the Union

Winton U. Solberg - History - 1990 - 428 pages
...freemen rather than to live slaves. 8 [From this point the declaration follows Jefferson's draft.] Lest this declaration should disquiet the minds of...subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored.—Necessity has not yet driven us into that desperate measure, or induced us to excite any...
Limited preview - About this book

Tea Party to Independence: The Third Phase of the American Revolution, 1773-1776

Peter David Garner Thomas - History - 1991 - 357 pages
...undoubtedly attainable. Despite this threat, care was taken to disclaim any motive of independence. 'We mean not to dissolve that union which has so long...subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored.'129 Those delegates anxious to tread the path of independence were aware that premature disclosure...
Limited preview - About this book

Nationalism: Five Roads to Modernity

Liah Greenfeld - History - 1992 - 581 pages
...months before the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress protested that it did not wish "to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between American colonies and the mother country." To see in the conflict an attempt of a colonized nation,...
Limited preview - About this book

The American Revolution, 1763-1783: A History of the American People: an ...

Herbert Aptheker - History - 1960 - 304 pages
...foreign assistance is undoubtedly attainable. . . . We mean not to dissolve that union [in the Empire] which has so long and so happily subsisted between...has not yet driven us into that desperate measure. . . . In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birth-right . . . for the protection...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations: Volume 1, The Creation ...

Bradford Perkins, Walter LaFeber, Warren I. Cohen, Akira Iriye - History - 1995 - 272 pages
...the members avowed a determination "to die free men rather than to live slaves," but also asserted, "We mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us. ... We have not raised armies with ambitious designs of separating from Great Britain, and establishing...
Limited preview - About this book

The Dynamics of American Ethnic, Religious, and Racial Group Life: An ...

Philip Perlmutter - History - 1996 - 244 pages
...months before writing the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress said its intention was not "to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between" the colonies and England; and two months after the Battle of Bunker Hill, Thomas Jefferson wrote that...
Limited preview - About this book

Abraham Lincoln: A Constitutional Biography

George Anastaplo - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 373 pages
...preservation of [their] liberties." At the same time, they assured their supporters in Great Britain, "We mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us."23 A year later, however, they must "acquiesce in the Necessity" of declaring independence. Since...
Limited preview - About this book

Dreams of a More Perfect Union

Provost and Professor of Political Science Rogan Kersh, Rogan Kersh - History - 2001 - 358 pages
...Britain's rhetorical displacement. "Our [intercolonial] union is perfect," they wrote, adding quickly: "Lest this declaration should disquiet the minds of...assure them that we mean not to dissolve that Union [with the King] which ... we sincerely wish to see restored." 102 This conceptual dissonance was cleared...
Limited preview - About this book

The American Revolution

Joseph C. Morton - History - 2003 - 218 pages
...accumulated and unexampled outrages were hurried on. ... Our cause is just. Our union is perfect. . . . Lest this declaration should disquiet the minds of...has not yet driven us into that desperate measure We have not raised armies with ambitious designs of separating from Great-Britain, and establishing...
Limited preview - About this book

Benjamin Franklin: An American Life

Walter Isaacson - Biography & Autobiography - 2003 - 608 pages
...Congress also passed a Declaration of the Causes and Necessity for Taking Up Arms, in which it proclaimed "that we mean not to dissolve that union which has...us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored." Like the other delegates, Franklin agreed for the sake of consensus to sign the Olive Branch Petition....
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF