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" The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, Are of imagination all compact. One sees more devils than vast hell can hold ; That is, the madman : the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt : The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth... "
The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare - Page 139
by William Shakespeare - 1846
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1828
...things unknown, the poct's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local hahitation, and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination ;...the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear? Hip. But all the story of the night told over, And all their minds tnmsfigur'd so...
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Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical and Critical, Volume 20

George Daniel, John Cumberland - English drama - 1828
...imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation, and a name. Such tricks...that joy ; Or, in the night, imagining some fear, i How easy is a bush suppos'da bear? Hip. But all the story of the night told over And all their minds...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy /////. But all the story of the night told over, And all their minds transngur'd so together, More...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...Apartment in the Palace of Theseus. Enter THESEUS, HIPPOI.YTA, PIIII.OSTRATE, Lords, ami Attendants. Hip. Tis strange, my Theseus, that these lovers speak of....story of the night told over, And all their minds transfigured so together, More witnesseth than fancy's images, And grows to something of great constancy...
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The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...on his behalf. The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation, and a name. Such tricks...the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear ? 7 — v. 1 . 342 How wayward is this foolish love, That, like a testy babe, will...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1839 - 460 pages
...of the goshawk. The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation, and a name. Such tricks...the night, 'imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear ? 7 — v. 1. 342 How wayward is this foolish love, That, like a testy babe, will scratch...
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The Monthly magazine

Monthly literary register - 1839
...forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothings A local habitation and a name. Such tricks hath strong...the night imagining some fear. How easy is a bush supposed a bear!'' I?eally, some people write as if such passages as these had no existence — as...
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The Philosophy of Shakspere: Extracted from His Plays

William Shakespeare, Michael Henry Rankin - 1841 - 238 pages
...sugar o'er The devil himself. Hamlet. AofrSi. Scene 1. * Too often experienced. ITS POWEB. Theseus, Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such...imagining some fear, How easy is a bush suppos'da bear ! Midsummer Night's Dream. Act v. Scene 1. Leontes. Affection ! * thy intention stabs the center: Thou...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1843
...: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold ; That is, the madman : the lover, all as frantick, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt : The poet's...the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear? Hip. But all the story of the night told over, And all their minds transfigured so...
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Midsummer-night's dream. Love's labor's lost. Merchant of Venice. As y@u ...

William Shakespeare - 1844
...cool reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, Are of imagination all compact.1 One sees more devils than vast hell can hold ; That...the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear ! Hip. But all the story of the night told over, And all their minds transfigured so...
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