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" O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers; Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. "
The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ... - Page 40
by William Shakespeare - 1769
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Dublin examination papers

Dublin city, univ - 1858
...locari; Sive dolo, seu jam Trojae sie fata ferebant. TO BE TRANSLATED INTO GREEK TRAGIC TRIMETERS. O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with theae butehers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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Shakespeare's Tragedies: An Introduction

Dieter Mehl - Drama - 1986 - 272 pages
...play, appears no more biased or distorted than Brutus' idealizing image of a disinterested sacrifice: O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - Acting - 1990 - 207 pages
...key to his release of the feelings of sorrow, anger and hatred that pour out in his prophecy. Antony: O pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers; Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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The Capacity for Wonder: Preserving National Parks

William Lowry - Political Science - 2010 - 296 pages
...line from Shakespeare that I had seen as the caption on a poster of a ravaged, clear-cut forest area: "O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!"*' If we let our national parks suffer a similar fate—cut, paved, dammed or developed...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...mean of death, As here by Caesar, and by you cut off, The choice and master spirits of this age. 43 O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature

Merriam-Webster, Inc, MERRIAM-WEBSTER STAFF, Encyclopaedia Britannica Publishers, Inc. Staff - Reference - 1995 - 1236 pages
...Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Mark Antony addresses the corpse of Caesar in the speech that begins: O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. That I am meek and gentle with these butchers! Thou art the ruins ot the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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Shakespeare's World of Death: The Early Tragedies

Richard Courtney - Drama - 1995 - 268 pages
...docility and humility, accepts. The conspirators leave. Left alone, Antony turns to Caesar's corpse: O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers. Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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Betty the Yeti: An Eco-fable

Jon Klein - Drama - 1995 - 69 pages
...ready for you. TERRA. Put it down, Russ. RUSS. Oh, I know where to put it. IKO. Please. Stop it! TREY. "Pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, that I am meek and gentle with these butchers." Shakespeare. RUSS. "Kiss your ass good-bye, college boy." Russ Sawyer. IKO. I mean...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...private thoughts. Until this moment he has been unemotional. Now he cries his pain over Caesar's murder: O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...more. MARCUS BRUTUS. Prepare the body, then, and follow us. [Exeunt all but ANTONY. MARCUS ANTONIUS. a world to see! — Well said, i'faith, neighbour Verges: — well, God's these butchers! Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to...
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