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Books Books 91 - 97 of 97 on Where nothing is, but all things seem. And we the shadows of the dream, It is a modest....
" Where nothing is, but all things seem. And we the shadows of the dream, It is a modest creed, and yet Pleasant if one considers it, To own that death itself must be. Like all the rest, a mockery. That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes... "
A Manual of Anthropology: Or, Science of Man, Based on Modern Research - Page 245
by Charles Bray - 1871 - 358 pages
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The Moment of Explosion: Blake and the Illustration of Milton

Stephen C. Behrendt - Literary Criticism - 1983 - 211 pages
...artist. 77. Shelley echoes this perception at the conclusion of "The Sensitive Plant," when he asserts, For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change: their might Exeeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure. 78. Damon, William Blake: His Philosophy...
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Stone Cottage: Pound, Yeats, and Modernism

James Longenbach - Literary Criticism - 1991
...the Sensitive Plant: "That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and odours there, In truth have never passed away; 'Tis we, 'tis ours,...beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change; their light Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure." The same concoction of...
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The Selected Poetry and Prose of Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fiction - 1994 - 692 pages
...all the rest, a mockery. That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and odours there, In truth have never passed away: Tis we, 'tis ours, are changed; not they. 20 For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change: their might Exceeds our organs,144...
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Quantum Poetics: Yeats, Pound, Eliot, and the Science of Modernism

Daniel Albright - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 307 pages
...like Blake and Shelley, Pound hoped to unclog the senses, to let in the radical light, the deep sound: For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death...endure No light, being themselves obscure. (Shelley, "The Sensitive-Plant" [182o]) there are two aesthetic ideals, one the Wagnerian . . . ie you confuse...
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Working Class Studies

Renny Christopher, Lisa Orr, Linda Strom - Social Science - 1998 - 256 pages
...Consciousness in Literary Form That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and nelours there, In truth have never passed away: 'Tis we, 'tis ours,...organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure. — Percy Bysshe Shelley, "The Sensitive Plant," 3.II. 130-37 These concluding stanzas of Shelley's...
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El platonismo romántico de Shelley

Patricia Cruzalegui Sotelo - English poetry - 2001 - 183 pages
...en su última estrofa, contrapone el amor, la belleza y el deleite como entidades indestructibles: For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death...endure No light, being themselves obscure. Shelley sí cree en un reino de las esencias, aunque su pesimismo a veces parezca ocultarlo. El amor, la belleza...
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The Silent Traveller in Oxford

Yee Chiang - Oxford (England) - 2003 - 209 pages
...all the rest, a mockery. That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and odours there, In truth have never passed away: Tis we, 'tis ours, are...organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure. He shed tears on a faded violet, whereas most human beings refuse to dwell upon the sad and unpleasant...
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