Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on. "
The Works of Shakespear: Troilus and Cressida. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello - Page 286
by William Shakespeare - 1768
Full view - About this book

Memoir of a Modern Opium Eater

McVea - Biography & Autobiography - 2003 - 236 pages
...with your comrade to his inauguration into The Dungeon of All Human Suffering: The House of Pain " 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world." It's many years now—and oh, how it does seem like centuries—since...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge Shakespeare Library

Catherine M. S. Alexander
...another imagined scene of infectious nocturnal emission, prior to his bedchamber encounter with Gertrude: 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world. (3-2-377~9) Lucrece's 'make sick the Ufe of purity', like...
Limited preview - About this book

The Kendall/Hunt Anthology: Literature to Write About

K. H. Anthol - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 313 pages
...will say so [Exit. Ham. "By and by" is easily said. Leave me, friends. [Exeunt all but Hamlet.] 405 Tis now the very witching time of night When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood. And do such bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

Humoring the Body: Emotions and the Shakespearean Stage

Gail Kern Paster - Literary Criticism - 2010 - 288 pages
...correspondence, new in him but familiar to us in the actions of Pyrrhus, between night and his own state of mind: "Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn and hell itself [breathes] out Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood, And do such [bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

The Seven Basic Plots: Why We Tell Stories

Christopher Booker - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 728 pages
...given his stepfather, he is now summoning up all his resolve to commit the ultimate act of darkness: 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out, Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood And do such bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

Italian Mysteries, Or, More Secrets Than One

Francis Lathom - Fiction - 2005 - 384 pages
...for my dear master's return, and I am come to consult widyou what is to be done for the best; for, ' Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world;' and therefore he must not be left unsought after any...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Tragic Sequence

Kenneth Muir - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 207 pages
...avenger. He appears to be working himself up to a state of excitement in which he can kill the King: "Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 896 pages
...Rosencrantz and Guildenstem depart HAMLET 'By and by' is easily said. Leave me, friends. [the rest go 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

The Best-loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - English literature - 2004 - 160 pages
...convinced that Claudius murdered his father and he is determined on revenge. Hamlet's thoughts on revenge 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare and the Ideal of Love

Jill Line - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 192 pages
...lunacy of hellish darkness and, as his heart hardens, his speech becomes as murderous as Macbeth's: 'Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on. 2.379-83 The dark...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF