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" Cannot be ill; cannot be good: if ill, Why hath it given me earnest of success, Commencing in a truth? I am thane of Cawdor: If good, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair And make my seated heart knock at my ribs, Against... "
Macbeth: A Tragedy in Five Acts - Page 13
by William Shakespeare - 1847 - 60 pages
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Lectures on Shakespeare

W. H. Auden - Drama - 2002 - 398 pages
...stir" (I.iii. 143-44) — but he doesn't do so, nor does he ask what he should do. Instead, he says, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid image...Are less than horrible imaginings. My thought, whose murther yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man that function Is smother'd in surmise...
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Shakespeare and Religion: Essays of Forty Years

G. Wilson Knight - Literary Collections - 2002 - 374 pages
...iii. 130) The words come out in jerks, spasms, almost gasps. He describes his breathless state: 188 If good, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid...heart knock at my ribs, Against the use of nature? (i.iii. 134) He is all nervy and dithery. Later on, again talking of the murder: If it were done, when...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - Fiction - 2002 - 375 pages
...after having named the Thane of Cawdor and having been cheated by the pagan witches, speaks to himself: "My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,...smothered in surmise, and nothing is / But what is not" (Macbeth 1.3. 138-41). "Nothing is but what is not" is the strongest possible statement ever made against...
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The Wisdom of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Political Science - 2002 - 228 pages
...direct villany. Therefore, be abhorr'd All feasts, societies, and throngs of men! Timon — Timon IV.iii Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings: My...Shakes so my single state of man that function Is smother 'd in surmise, and nothing is But what is not. Macbeth — Macbeth I. Hi I dare do all that...
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Visceral Sensory Neuroscience: Interoception

Oliver G. Cameron M.D., Ph.D. - Medical - 2001 - 276 pages
...central nervous system locations in the human. eight THE CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEMS I am Thane of Cawdor: If good, why do I yield to that suggestion...doth unfix my hair and make my seated heart knock against my ribs, against the use of nature? Present fears are less than horrible imaginings. William...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - Business & Economics - 2002 - 320 pages
...Do we see ourselves here? As he says: . . . why do I yield to that suggestion [of murdering Duncan] Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair, And make my...heart knock at my ribs, Against the use of nature? MACBETH (1.3, 134-37) We understand the temptation he faces because we, too, aspire to the big job....
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The Selected Papers of Jane Addams: vol. 1: Preparing to Lead, 1860-81

Mary Lynn Bryan, Barbara Bair, Maree de Angury, Jane Addams - Biography & Autobiography - 2010 - 704 pages
...ill, cannot be good. If ill, / Why hath it given me earnest of success / Commencing in a truth? I am Thane of Cawdor. / If good, why do I yield to that...suggestion / Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair / . . . Presem fears / Are less than horrible imaginings" (act 1, sc. 3, lines 131-39i. 9. Lady Macbeth,...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 16

Allardyce Nicoll - Drama - 2002 - 208 pages
...against the use of nature. In fact the whole passage is strangely filled with suggestions of the stage: My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man that function Is smother'd in surmise, and nothing is But what is not. Macbeth is rapt and saying to himself, ' Of things...
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Shakespeare's Tragic Skepticism

Millicent Bell - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 283 pages
...destiny — bursts upon his mind, and his Thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so [his] single state of man that function Is smothered in surmise, and nothing is, But what is not. Coleridge wrote, "Every word of his soliloquy shows the early birth-date of his guilt." But if this...
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Macbeth

Tanya Grosz, Linda Wendler - Drama - 2003 - 47 pages
...that you are so." 3. "Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear your favours nor vour hate." it 4. "My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical,...smothered in surmise, and nothing is but what is not." 5. "There's no art to find the man's construction in the face: He was a gentleman on whom I built an...
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