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Books Books 11 - 20 of 22 on Imagination, the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations;....
" Imagination, the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations; an opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason; inclination, liking; caprice, humour, whim ” frolick, idle scheme, vagary. "
A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and Expositor of the English Language ... - Page 201
by John Walker - 1825 - 103 pages
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An Explanatory and Phonographic Pronouncing Dictionary of the English ...

William Bolles - English language - 1845 - 944 pages
...-nes, n. The quality of being fanciful. Addiction to the pleasures of imagination. FANCY, fin-si, n. Imagination; the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations! of things or persons. An opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason. Taste. Image ; conception....
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A Phonographic Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language: Abridged from ...

William Bolles - English language - 1846 - 689 pages
...Fanciful, fan-se-iol, a. rather goided by imagination than reason ; full of wiid images. Fancy, fan-si, n. imagination, the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations of things or persons ; an opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason ; taste, caprice,...
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An Explanatory and Phonographic Pronouncing Dictionary of the English ...

William Bolles - English language - 1846 - 944 pages
...fnn-'sS-fAl-nes, n. The quality of being fanciful. Addiction to the pleasures of imagination. FANCY, fln^se1, n. Imagination; the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representation* of things or persons. An opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason. Taste....
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London labour and the London poor, Volume 2

Henry Mayhew - Charities - 1851
...of the word '•' fancy," at all strained or very original, for it is lexicographically defined as " an opinion bred rather by the imagination than the...caprice, humour, whim, frolick, idle scheme, vagary." OP ТИЕ STBEET-SELLERS OP SPOBTIKO DOGS. THE use, if use it may be styled, of sporting, or fighting...
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A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language: Incorporating the ...

James Knowles - English language - 1851 - 790 pages
...imagination. FANCIFULNESS, fan^se-fol-nes, n. Addiction to the pleasures of imagination. FANCY, An^tt, n. Imagination ; the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations of things or persons. An opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason. Taste. Image ; conception....
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A dictionary of the Spanish and English languages, orig. compiled by Neuman ...

Henry Neuman, Giuseppe Marc' Antonio Baretti - 1862
...miry. Fino, an. (Obs.) Fane, temple. Fantasear, vn. To fancy, to imagine. Fantasia, */. 1 . Fancy, imagination, the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations. 2. Fantasv, the power of imagining. 3. Fancy, caprice, humour, whim, conceit. 4. Fancy, an opinion...
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London Labour and the London Poor: The Condition and Earnings of ..., Volume 2

Henry Mayhew - Charities - 1861
...the word " fancy," at all strained or very original, for it is lexicographically defined as *• au opinion, bred rather by the imagination than the reason, inclination, liking, caprice, humour, whim, frolīck, idle scheme, vagary." OP THE ST BEET -SELLERS op SPORTING Docs. THF. me. if use it may be...
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Routledge's pronouncing dictionary of the English language

P Austin Nuttall - 1867
...Fancilulness. Fan'cl-lesa, a. Destitute of fancy. Fan'criok-et, x. An insect ; the churr-worm. Fan'cy, s. The power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations of things or persons ; creative imagination ; conception ; inclination ; liking ; caprice ; humour...
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Chambers's English Dictionary: Pronouncing, Explanatory, and Etymological ...

English language - 1872 - 952 pages
...whimsically. FANCIFULNESS, fan'si-fool-nes, ». The quality of FANCY, fan'si, '.n. (orig.) Fantasy : the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations of persons or things : an image or representation thus formed : an unreasonable or capricious opinion...
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Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past, 1660-1781

Richard G. Terry - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 354 pages
...'fiction'; and also defined in terms of each « Ibid. other are 'imagination' and 'fancy', these meaning 'the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations of things'. A third term also mapping on to the same semantic space is 'wit' (1) meaning 'Imagination;...
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