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" Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing,... "
The Tatler - Page 265
1803
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Elocution, Or, Mental and Vocal Philosophy: Involving the Principles of ...

C. P. Bronson - Elocution - 1845 - 384 pages
...I would have such a fellow whipped for c/enloing termagant, it out-Herod's Herod. Pray you. a ro id it. Be not too tame, neither; but let your own discretion...be your tutor. Suit the action — to the word, the too*"* — to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature:...
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Elocution, Or, Mental and Vocal Philosophy: Involving the Principles of ...

C. P. Bronson - Elocution - 1845 - 320 pages
...inexplicable dumb-show and write. I would have such a fellow ichipp'd for overdoing termagant, it out-Herod's Herod. Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame, neither;...but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action—to the word, the word—to the action; with this special observance, that you o'crstep not...
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The rhetorical reader, consisting of choice specimens of oratorical ...

John Hall Hindmarsh - 1845 - 80 pages
...Ter'gament ; it o"utherods He'rod, — Pray y"ou, avoid-it. Be not too tam'e, nei'ther ; but, let your discretion be your tu'tor. Suit the a'ction to the...wo'rd, the wo'rd to the ac'tion, with this special obserVauce, that you o'erste'p-not-the-modesty of nature : for, anything so overd'one/ is from the...
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Elocution, Or, Mental and Vocal Philosophy: Involving the Principles of ...

C. P. Bronson - Elocution - 1845 - 384 pages
...whipped for o'erdoiug termagant, it out-Herod's Herod. Piny you, avoid íL Be not too lame, ╗cither; but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action — to the word, the ico~i — to the action; with tiiis special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature:...
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The Kendall/Hunt Anthology: Literature to Write About

K. H. Anthol - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 313 pages
...o'erdoing Termagant. It outherods Herod. Pray you, avoid it. 16 [I.] Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...the word, the word to the action; with this special 20 observance, that you [o'erstep] not the modesty of nature. For anything so overdone is from the...
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Confessions of an English Opium Eater

Thomas De Quincey - Biography & Autobiography - 2003 - 296 pages
...exhortation to the troupe of players who are to perform at the court of Denmark: 'Suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature' (Shakespeare, Hamlet, III, ii, 17-19). 147. at her request and M.'s ... W 's poems: M. is Margaret;...
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Stage Directions in Hamlet: New Essays and New Directions

Hardin L. Aasand - Drama - 2003 - 234 pages
...of Hamlet's personality provides only one of many disturbing parallels between Hamlet and Polonius. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor. (16-17) Later in the same scene Hamlet facetiously responds to Guildenstern's chastisement for his...
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Rhetoric and Renaissance Culture

Heinrich F. Plett - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 581 pages
...o'erdoing Termagant, it outHerods Herod. Pray you avoid it. 1st Player. I warrant your honour. Hamlet: Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so o'erdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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So You Want to be a Theatre Director?

Stephen Unwin - Drama - 2004 - 248 pages
...o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it. FIRST PLAYER I warrant your honour. HAMLET Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature: for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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Charles Brockden Brown and the Literary Magazine: Cultural Journalism in the ...

Michael Cody - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2004 - 213 pages
...(3). 10. The metaphor of the mirror is taken from act 3, scene 2, of William Shakespeare's Hamlet: Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so o'erdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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