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" Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin new reap'd Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest-home ; He was perfumed like a milliner ; And 'twixt his finger and his thumb he held A pouncet-box, which ever and... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page 230
by William Shakespeare - 1805
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The book of recitations [ed.] by C.W. Smith

Charles William Smith (professor of elocution.) - 1857
...Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king ? HOTSPUR'S DESCRIPTION OF A FOP. Henry IV. Part I. MY liege, I did deny no prisoners ; But I remember,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat and trimly dressed, Fresh, as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reaped, Showed like a stubble-land at...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1857
...your majesty: Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. I In/. My liege, I did deny no prisoners : But, I remember,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at...
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1858
...front, — the moody front of a servant brow ; and in A. iii. sc. 2 " frontier " seems used for fort. North. Yea, my good lord. Those prisoners in your...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at...
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1858
...demanded, Which Harry Percy here at Ilolmedon took, Were, as he says, not with such strength denied As isf deliver'd to your majesty : Either envy, therefore,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, (") First folio omits, nai,ie. It) First f"Uu, Ğuğ. • Kither en\y, therefore,...
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McGuffey's New Eclectic Speaker: Containing about Three Hundred ..., Book 8

William Holmes McGuffey - Elocution - 1858 - 504 pages
...dialogue which forms the succeeding exercise. It may be spoken independently, or in connection with that. MY liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dressed, Fresh as a bridegroom : and his chin, new reaped, Showed like a stubble-land at harvest home....
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1858 - 40 pages
...your majesty : Ether envy, therefore, or misprision Ь guilty of this fault, and not my son.* Нот. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly drees'd, (*) First folio omite, name. (t) First fulio, irai. • Either envy, therefore,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Plays Ed. from the Folio of ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare, Richard Grant White - Andronicus, Titus (Legendary character) - 1859
...your Majesty: Either envy, therefore, or misprision Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Hotspur. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But I remember,...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at...
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The works of William Shakspere; from the text of the editions by C. Knight ...

William Shakespeare - 1859
...therefore, or misprieion, Is guilty of this fault, and not my son. Hot. My liege, I did deny no prisonets. But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was...leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at...
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The elements of elocution and correct reading

Charles Richson - 1860
...grace's secretary. Pope. 4. Hotspur's Sarcastic description of a Foppish Nobleman oi the Field of Battle. My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But I remember,...my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress 'd, Fresh as a bridegroom ; and his chin, new reap'd, Show'd like a stubble-land at harvest home...
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The Works of Shakespeare: Preface, Life, etc. The two gentlemen of Verona ...

William Shakespeare - 1862
...Harry Percy here at Holmedon took, Were, as he says, not with such strength denied As isf delivcr'd foundered" The heat is past, follow no further now...will, on my life, One time or other break some gallow and trimly dresa'd, ( • I First folio omitl, name. (t) First folio, teat. * Either envy, therefore,...
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