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" More strange than true. I never may believe These antique fables, nor these fairy toys. Lovers, and madmen, have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. • The lunatic, the lover, and the poet,... "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: Midsummer night's ... - Page 61
by William Shakespeare - 1823
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German Shakespeare Studies at the Turn of the Twenty-first Century

Christa Jansohn - Drama - 2006 - 318 pages
...driven by fancy or imagination (both terms are largely synonymous in those pre-Coleridgean times) : Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such...comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact. What is being stated here, in the final phase of an Elizabethan comedy,...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Dramatists, English - 2007 - 1280 pages
...Theseus, that these lovers JL speak of. THESEUS. More strange than true: I never may believe These antick If you did, I care not. CASSIUS. When Caesar lived...me. MARCUS BRUTUS. Peace, peace! you durst not so Jiell can hold, — That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of...
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Medievalism: The Middle Ages in Modern England

Michael Alexander - History - 2007 - 306 pages
...Night's Dream (Vi1-8, 14-17): HIPPOLYTA: 'Tis strange, my Theseus, that these lovers speak of. THESEUS: More strange than true. I never may believe These...comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact. . . . And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown,...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare's Comedies

Penny Gay - Literary Criticism - 2008
...speeches is that of Theseus in the last act, just as 'Pyramus and Thisbe' is about to be performed: I never may believe These antique fables, nor these...comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact: . . . The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven...
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