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" To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labour tends, and of which every desire prompts the prosecution. "
The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Page 414
1842
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The Mother's Assistant and Young Lady's Friend, Volume 3

Child rearing - 1843
...which he feels in privacy to be useless incumbrances, and to lose all effect when they become familiar. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labor tends, and of which every desire prompts prosecution. It is indeed a theme by which every man...
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The Life of Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1844 - 735 pages
...him in England to sadden fts hopes, and check its buoyancy. " To be happy at home," says Johnson, " is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labour tends." But Lord Byron had no home, — at least none that deserved this endearing name. A fond family circle,...
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Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and ..., Volumes 1-2

Anna Maria Hall - 1845
...that ilie is the image of God ; and defects, in order to show tliat she is only his image. — Pascal. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and Wwur tends, and of which every desire prompts the proscrution. — Johnson. CONTENTS. King Henry V....
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Materials for thinking extracted from the works of the learned of all ages

Materials - 1846
...he feels, in privacy, to be useless encumbrances, and to lose all effect when they become familiar. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all...prosecution. It is, indeed, at home that every man mast be known by those who would make a just estimate of his virtue, or felicity ; for smiles and embroidery...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: With an Essay on His Life and Genius

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - 1846
...be useless incumbrances, and to lose all effect when they become familiar. To be happy at home > - the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which...prosecution. It is, indeed, at home that every man must bo known by those who would make a just estimate either of his virtue or felicity ; for smiles and...
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The Churchman's companion, Volume 1

1847
...privacy to be useless encumbrances, and to lose all effect when they become familiar. To be happy at bome is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to...labour tends, and of which every desire prompts the execution. It is, indeed, at home that every man must be known by those who would have a just estimate...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 14

1847
...the greater part ignorant of the character they leave and of the character they assume. — Burlte. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labor lends and of which every desire prompts the prosecution. — Johnson. LADY MARY. THOU wert fair,...
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Sharpe's London Magazine, Volume 4

English literature - 1847
...leisure, and attend humbly and dutifully upon the issues of his wise and just providenee. — Soath. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to whieh even- enterprise and labour tends, and of whieh every desire prompts the proseeation.— Johnson....
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The Family friend [ed. by R.K. Philp]., Volume 2

Robert Kemp Philp
...which he feels in privacy to be useless incumbrances, and to lose all effect when they become familiar. To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all...and of which every desire prompts the prosecution. In our opinion, a man who, when he has nothing else to do, can play with his cat at home by the fireside...
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Eliza Cook's Journal, Volume 3

Eliza Cook - 1850
...furnished in about equal proportions, so much easier is it to die for religion than to live for it. IT is, indeed, at home that every man must be known by those who would make a just estimate either of his virtue or felicity ; for smiles and embroidery are aliko occasional, and the mind is...
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