Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Shakespeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike the second heat Upon the Muses... "
The Works of Shakespeare: Collated with the Oldest Copies, and Corrected - Page viii
by William Shakespeare - 1773
Full view - About this book

Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest ..., Volume 1

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1847
...they were not of nature's family. Yet must I not give nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must Lincoln fashion ; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike...
Full view - About this book

Shakspeare's Hamlet: An Attempt to Find the Key to a Great Moral Problem, by ...

Sir Edward Strachey - 1848 - 103 pages
...themselves. As Ben Jonson says — Yet must I not give nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part ; For though the Poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion.• Look how the father's face Lives in his issue ; even so the race Of Shakspeare's mind and...
Full view - About this book

Studies of Shakspere: Forming a Companion Volume to Every Edition of the Text

Charles Knight - 1849 - 360 pages
...construction of his expression : — " Yet must I not give Nature all : thy art, My gentle Shakspere, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter Nature be, His art doth give the fashion : and that he Who casts to write a living line must sweat (Such as thine are), and strike the...
Full view - About this book

Notes and Queries

Electronic journals - 1893
...Jonson did not think so : — " Yet must I not give Nature all, thy art my gentle Shakespeare must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter, nature be. His art doth give the fashion." And he goes on to point out that Shakespeare's "mind and manners brightly shine in his wellturned...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...were not of Nature's family. Yet must I not give Nature all : thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part : For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion ; and that he, Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine are,) and strike...
Full view - About this book

Rhyming dictionary for the use of young poets, with an essay on English ...

Thomas Smibert - 1852
...she will vouchsafe no other wit. Yet must I not give Nature all ; thy Art, My gentle Shakspere, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter Nature be, His Art doth give the fashion ; and that he Who casts to write a living line must sweat (Such as thine are), and strike the...
Full view - About this book

The American Whig Review, Volumes 15-16

1852
...ancients, thus writes of him : " Yet must I not give Nature all ; thy Art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part ; For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and that He, Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as are thine,) and strike...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 884 pages
...were not of Nature's family. Yet must I not give Nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must ot. Why, it cannot choose but be a noble plot. — And then the power of Sco fashion ; and that he, Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine are) and strike...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
...were not of Nature's family. Yet must I not give Nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part : For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion ; and that he, Who easts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine are) and strike...
Full view - About this book

The book of celebrated poems

Book - 1854 - 448 pages
...they were not of nature's family. Yet must I not give nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike the...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF