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" Nay then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting: I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Richard III. Henry VIII. Troilus ... - Page 251
by William Shakespeare - 1826
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1853
...A wav, if it lake right, in spite of fortune, Will bring me ofT again. What's this— To the Pope t hake greatness ; And, from that full meridian ofmv glory, I haste now to my setting : I shall (all Like...
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Beauties of the British Poets, with a Few Introd. Observations

George Croly (Rev., ed) - 1854
...have pitied him. WOLSEY. Nay then, farewell, I have touched the highest point of all my greatneu ; And from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now...exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more. So farewell to the little good you bear me. Farewell, a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

Elocution - 1854
...KINO HENRY VOL — /. NAT, then, farewell, I have touched the highest point of all my greatness ; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste...exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more. So farewell to the little good you bear me. Farewell, a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is...
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The Characteristics and Laws of Figurative Language

David Nevins Lord - Figures of speech - 1854 - 306 pages
...naturally excite and perpetuate friendship. " I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness ; And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now...exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more." SHAKSFEABI. By an elliptical metaphor, his highest official station is called his greatness, as though...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1854
...way, if it take right, in spite of fortune Will bring me off again. What's this 1 — "To the Pope?" The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ...farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness, And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now to my setting : I shall fall Like a...
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A Complete Dictionary of Poetical Quotations: Comprising the Most Excellent ...

Sarah Josepha Buell Hale - Quotations, English - 1855 - 570 pages
...means the happier to rise. Shake. Cymbeline. 1 're toueh' d the highest point of all my greatness : And from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now...exhalation in the evening ; And no man see me more. Shah. Henry VIII. He, that tlis morn rose proudly as the sun, And breaking through a mist of elients'...
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The Characteristics and Laws of Figurative Language

David Nevins Lord - Figures of speech - 1855 - 306 pages
...naturally excite and perpetuate friendship. " I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness ; And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now...exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more." SHAKSPEARE. By an elliptical metaphor, his highest official station is called his greatness, as though...
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The New Purchase, Or, Early Years in the Far West, Volume 1, Parts 1-2

Baynard Rush Hall - Bloomington (Ind.) - 1855 - 471 pages
...chapter. CHAPTEE LXII. " Nay then farewell I I havo tnuch'd the highest point of all my greatness : And from that full meridian of my glory I haste now...exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more." ABOUT the middle of October, a small Christian chapel was, one night, filled to overflowing; and deeply...
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Shakespere's historical play of King Henry the Eighth, arranged for ...

William Shakespeare - 1855 - 89 pages
...way, if it take right, in spite of fortune, Will bring me off again. What's this — To the Pope ? The letter, as I live, with all the business , I writ...farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness : And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now my setting : I shall fall Like a...
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Great Truths by great Authors

1856
...greatest Men. <ffitteatttejSS. — Shakspeare. T HAVE touch'd the highest point of all my Greatness ; And from that full Meridian of my glory, I haste now...exhalation in the Evening, And no man see me more. . — Sir Philip Sidney. Great, in affliction, bear a countenance more Princely than they are wont...
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