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" Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuffd bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart? "
The poet's daughter - Page 180
by Poet - 1837
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The Poetical Works of the Rev. George Crabbe: Tales of the hall

George Crabbe - Poets, English - 1834 - 320 pages
...and I fear Thou play'dst most foully for it — Macbeth. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Rase out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the foul bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon...
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The Young Lady's Book of Piety: A Practical Manual of Christian Duties for ...

Young women - 1835 - 275 pages
...distempers of intemperance? Can it silence the reproaches of conscience ? procure the physician that can 9 ' Minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory...sorrow, Rase out the written troubles of the brain, And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuff"d bosom of that perilous .stiillj Which...
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Mores Catholici: Or, Ages of Faith ...

Kenelm Henry Digby - Church history - 1835
...but to him by whom he could be delivered, and asks, " Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Rase out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs...
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The Analyst: A Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, Natural ..., Volume 4

Edward Mammatt - Art - 1836
...one of the most pathetic passages of this noble play : " Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Rase out the written troubles of the brain, And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the foul bosom of that perilous stuff' Which weighs...
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Principles of elocution

William Graham (teacher of elocution.) - 1837
...troubled with thick-coming fancies, That keep her from her rest. Macb. Cure her of that : Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Haze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the...
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Truth without fiction, and religion without disguise; or, The two Oxford ...

Truth - 1837
...These are the scenes," said Althorpe, " in which we might say, with our Shakspeare — i Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote. Cleanse the steep'd...
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Select Works of the British Poets: In a Chronological Series from Falconer ...

John Aikin, John Frost - English poetry - 1838 - 732 pages
...plty'ilst most foully for it. Macbeth, act iii. sc. I. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, k And with souic sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the foul hosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs...
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Poetical Works, Volume 5

George Crabbe - 1837
...and I fear Thou play'dst most foully for it. — Macbeth. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Rase out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the foul bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 1130 pages
...troubled with thick-coming fancies, That keep her from her rest. Macb. Cure her of that : Canst thou x U 1 ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the...
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Tracts, Volume 3

English monthly tract society - 1838
...silence, and Mr. Tempest turned and looked at me with an expression that seemed to say — "Canst tliou not minister to a mind diseas'd ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ? " His conscience had now awoke, and he was writhing beneatn its accusations. His groans were deep,...
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