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" All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter. "
The Works of Edmund Burke - Page 72
by Edmund Burke - 1839
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Tahiti: The Island Paradise

Nicholas Senn - Manuscripts, English - 1906 - 254 pages
...island for commercial gain, and to extend her sovereignty in the South Seas, which only confirms that All government — indeed, every human benefit and...prudent act — is founded on compromise and barter. BURKE. After Cook's departure, nearly eleven years elapsed before another European ship called at Tahiti,...
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Speech on Conciliation with America

Edmund Burke - Great Britain - 1907 - 83 pages
...the demand of the Colonies had not been for Independence. support any given part of our Constitution, or even the whole of it together. I could easily,...every prudent act, is founded on /^compromise and 'liarterM We balance inconveniences; we give and take ; we remit some rights, that we may enjoy others...
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Speech of Edmund Burke, Esq., on Moving His Resolution for Conciliation with ...

Edmund Burke - Great Britain - 1908 - 79 pages
...Englishmen stop is very short of the principles upon which we support any given part of our Constitution, or even the whole of it together. I could easily,...This is nothing but what is natural and proper. All gov- 20 eminent, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act, is...
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Thomas J. Gargan, a Memorial: With an Appendix Containing Addresses ...

Helena Nordhoff Gargan - Lawyers - 1910 - 166 pages
...despairing of uniting the colonies under the Federal Union, and realizing, in the language of Burke, that "all government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment,...prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter," were forced to accept some compro102 mises, and recognized the existence of slavery, though every Southern...
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Thomas J. Gargan, a Memorial: With an Appendix Containing Addresses ...

Helena Nordhoff Gargan - Lawyers - 1910 - 166 pages
...despairing of uniting the colonies under the Federal Union, and realizing, in the language of Burke, that "all government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment,...prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter," were forced to accept some compromises, and recognized the existence of slavery, though every Southern...
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Famous Speeches

Herbert Woodfield Paul - Great Britain - 1911 - 456 pages
...Englishmen stop very short of the principles upon which we support any given part of our Constitution, or even the whole of it together. I could easily, if I had not altogether tired you, give you very striking and convincing instances of it. This is nothing but what...
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The Abolition Crusade and Its Consequences: Four Periods of American History

Hilary Abner Herbert - Antislavery movements - 1912 - 249 pages
...compromises, although statesmanship does. One of the most notable utterances of Edmund Burke was : "All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment,...prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter." Great statesmen, on great occasions, speak not only to their countrymen and for the time being, but...
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Webster's Work for the Union: A Paper Read Before the Fortnightly Club ...

Frank Bergen - United States - 1918 - 52 pages
...he had been a senator himself, and partly realized the truth of Burke 's familiar observation that "all government — indeed, every human benefit and...prudent act — is founded on compromise and barter." If official action, which necessarily recognized slavery, were convincing evidence of approval of slavery,...
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Webster's Work for the Union: A Paper Read Before the Fortnightly Club ...

Frank Bergen - United States - 1918 - 52 pages
...he had been a senator himself, and partly realized the truth of Burke 's familiar observation that "all government — indeed, every human benefit and...prudent act — is founded on compromise and barter." If official action, which necessarily recognized slavery, were convincing evidence of approval of slavery,...
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Burke on Conciliation with the Colonies

Edmund Burke - United States - 1920 - 87 pages
...Englishmen stop very short of the principles upon which we support any given part of our Constitution, or even the whole of it together. I could easily, if I had not already 20 tired you, give you very striking and convincing instances of it. This is "nothing but what is natural...
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