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Books Books 31 - 40 of 144 on The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria,....
" The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage... "
The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent Divines ... - Page 314
by Francis Wrangham - 1816
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The Court magazine and belle assemblée [afterw.] and monthly critic and the ...

Court magazine and monthly critic - 1837
...false. It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality, that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or for a single moment...when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himsejf at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage to Egypt, and that...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its Ň ' ބn n Xy 0m Zb >F k ˿ x |?1 W OO ana believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage to Egypt, and that he lives in the days...
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The complete works of William Shakspeare, with notes by the most emiinent ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...any dramatic fable in Us materiality was ever credible, or, for a single momeol, was ever crediled. d mathematics: his name spectalor really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes lhat his walk to the Ihealre has been...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1839
...false. It is false, that any representaJ tion is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment,...supposes, that when the play opens, the spectator really ima. • ^ 1 gines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage...
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The Discourses of Sir Joshua Reynolds

Sir Joshua Reynolds - Artists - 1824 - 279 pages
...says, " It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last,...
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The Edinburgh monthly magazine [afterw.] Blackwood's Edinburgh ..., Volume 56

1844
...of the drama — tiie development of charac(••r and passion. " The objection," siuí Dr Johnson, "arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Home, .-upnoses that, when the play opens, ilit spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and"...
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Doubtful plays: Titus Andronicus. Pericles. The two noble kinsmen. Plays ...

William Shakespeare - 1867
...false. It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or for a single moment...passing the first hour at Alexandria and the next at Home, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes...
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Selections from the Prose Writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - English language - 1893 - 146 pages
...13:28. "It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment was ever credited. . . The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last,...
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Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art: With a Critical Text and a ...

Samuel Henry Butcher - Aesthetics - 1895 - 384 pages
...generally held to follow as a corollary from Unity of Time.8 Corneille, the that any dramatic fable, in its materiality, was ever credible, or for a single moment was ever credited.' Dr. Johnson, Preface to Sfudcspeare. 1 With regard to Unity of Place Corneille says : « Cela aiderait...
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A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: The winter's tale. 1898

William Shakespeare - 1898
...false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment,...passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Kome, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes...
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