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Books Books 51 - 60 of 64 on The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria,....
" The objection arising from the impossibility of passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Rome, supposes that when the play opens, the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes that his walk to the theatre has been a voyage... "
The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent Divines ... - Page 314
by Francis Wrangham - 1816
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Literary Criticism, Pope to Croce

Gay Wilson Allen, Harry Hayden Clark - Literary Criticism - 1962 - 659 pages
...false. It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or for a single moment...himself at Alexandria and believes that his walk to the theater has been a voyage to Egypt and that he lives in the days of Antony and Cleopatra. Surely he...
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Neo-Classical Dramatic Criticism 1560-1770

Thora Burnley Jones, Bernard De Bear Nicol - Drama - 1976 - 188 pages
...place. 'It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment was ever credited.' Drama can only be credited, he says in a pregnant phrase, 'with all the credit due to drama'. Indeed,...
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The Shakespeare Revolution

J. L. Styan - Drama - 1983 - 304 pages
...self-contradiction: 'It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited,' and 'Delusion, if delusion be admitted, has no certain limitation.'18 Bethell set himself the task...
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Illusion and the Drama: Critical Theory of the Enlightenment and Romantic Era

Frederick Burwick - Literary Criticism - 2010
...After having asserted that no "representation is mistaken for realiiy," that no "dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited," Johnson goes on to argue that credibility derives from the contemplation of the emotional effects:...
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The Theory and Analysis of Drama

Manfred Pfister - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 339 pages
...observing the unities of time and place arises from the supposed necessity of making the drama credible. The objection arising from the impossibility of passing...voyage to Egypt, and that he lives in the days of Cleopatra . . . The truth is that the spectators are always in their senses and know, from the first...
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William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 568 pages
...truth: 'It is false that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited' Johnson's position is given the appearance of weight by its absoluteness, in the words which I have...
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Shakespeare's Theory of Drama

Pauline Kiernan - Drama - 1998 - 218 pages
...that '// is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited' (my emphasis)3. In our own century, semioticians have refuted the Coleridgean position. In The Semiotics...
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Samuel Johnson's "general Nature": Tradition and Transition in Eighteenth ...

Scott D. Evans - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 168 pages
...refutes: "It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited" (76). Johnson foregrounds the question of what makes drama engage the intellectual sympathy of audiences...
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The Winter's Tale

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...false. It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatic fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment,...passing the first hour at Alexandria, and the next at Home, supposes that when the play opens the spectator really imagines himself at Alexandria, and believes...
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The Secret History of Domesticity: Public, Private, and the Division of ...

Michael McKeon - History - 2006 - 904 pages
...But it "is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited. . . . Delusion, if delusion be admitted, has no certain limitation .... The delight of tragedy proceeds...
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