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" Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing,... "
The British Essayists - Page 257
1823
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autobigraphy of an actress

' - 1856
..."Sir?" " Anything— don't matter what — a touch of the tragic, if you like. But—'suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you overstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose...
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Hamlet: An Attempt to Ascertain Whether the Queen Were an Accessory, Before ...

C. Soames - Hamlet (Legendary character) - 1856 - 48 pages
...directions how to "speak the speech " appointed to each one, and has directed them to " suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that they o'erstep not the modesty of nature"—who can doubt that he also directed the living actors of...
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Class Book of Poetry: Consisting of Selections from Distinguished English ...

John Seely Hart - Readers - 1857 - 384 pages
...part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise: I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod: Pray...that you o'er-step not the modesty of nature: for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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The book of recitations [ed.] by C.W. Smith

Charles William Smith (professor of elocution.) - 1857
...part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise : I could have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod : pray...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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Principles of Elocution

Thomas Ewing - Elocution - 1857 - 412 pages
...groundlings ; who (for the most part) are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb-shows and noise. Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame neither ; but...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of Nature: for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing; whose end is — to hold, as 't were, the mirror...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 405 pages
...playing. After warning them not to be too tame either, he says that the players should Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so o'erdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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Hamlet

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - Drama - 2001 - 32 pages
...advises the actors on how to play their parts. Hamlet's instructions to the players Suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2002 - 178 pages
...o'erdoing Termagant. It outHerods Herod. Pray you avoid it. First Player i5 I warrant your honour. Hamlet Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...action, with this special observance, that you o'erstep 20 from . . . playing: contrary to the aims of drama. 21-2 hold . . . nature: show life as it really...
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Amleto

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 320 pages
...it. F1RST PLAYER I warrant your honour. HAMLET Be not too lame neither. But let your own cliscretion be your tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so o'erdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, 20 bolli at the tirst and now, was...
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Rhetoric and Kairos: Essays in History, Theory, and Praxis

Phillip Sipiora, James S. Baumlin - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 258 pages
...Frye terms it, Hamlet's advice to the Players affirms Ciceronian-Humanist decorum: Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. For anything so o'erdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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