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" MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, -without his own consent. "
Jura Anglorum: The Rights of Englishmen - Page 34
by Francis Plowden - 1792 - 620 pages
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The Real Business of Living

James Hayden Tufts - Democracy - 1918 - 476 pages
...Independence, he proclaims essentially democratic doctrines — freedom, equality, self-government: " Men being by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent." Men form governments,...
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The Real Business of Living

James Hayden Tufts - Democracy - 1918 - 476 pages
...Independence, he proclaims essentially democratic doctrines — freedom, equality, self-government: " Men being by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent." Men form governments,...
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The United States of America: A Study in International Organization

James Brown Scott - Constitutional law - 1920 - 605 pages
...1690, Book II, Ch. VIII, section 106, Works, Edition of 1714, Vol. II.) Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only Way...
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Development of Social Theory

James Pendleton Lichtenberger - Sociology - 1923 - 482 pages
...difference will best be seen by studying political society itself." " (2) "Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his consent, which is done by agree"...
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The Irresistible Movement of Democracy

John Simpson Penman - Democracy - 1923 - 729 pages
...property in his own person; this nobody has any right to but himself." 29 "Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent." 30 "The supreme...
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Christianity and the State: A Series of Lectures Delivered Before the ...

Samuel Parkes Cadman - Church and state - 1924 - 370 pages
...had been previously propounded by Locke in his "Treatise of Civil Government." "Men," he said, "being by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent." This proposition...
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The Heart of the Curriculum

Edward Ehrlich Smith - Books and reading - 1924 - 363 pages
...them from the people "to the common good of them all." An old saying had come down to them, "Men being by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent." These leaders...
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The Bookman, Volume 47

Book collecting - 1918
...live freely, and political liberty, was the faith so significantly expressed by John Locke: "Men being by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his consent." Gradually there has...
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The Meaning of Democracy

William Fletcher Russell, Thomas Henry Briggs - Democracy - 1941 - 413 pages
...we consider the different ends, ties, and bounds of each of these. 95. MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent, which is done...
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Citizenship Education and the Modern State

Kerry J. Kennedy - Education - 1997 - 185 pages
...the obligations that citizens voluntary assume when they agree to it. 'Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent," Locke wrote...
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