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" MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, -without his own consent. "
Jura Anglorum: The Rights of Englishmen - Page 34
by Francis Plowden - 1792 - 620 pages
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The Human Rights Reader: Major Political Writings, Essays, Speeches, and ...

Micheline Ishay - Political Science - 1997 - 518 pages
...from him. [...] Of the Beginning of Political Societies 95. Men being, as has been said, by natute all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political powet of anothet without his own consent. The only way wheteby...
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Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...against the injuries and attempts of other men. 6436 Second Treatise of Civil Government Man being ... sely said that we cannot really love anybody at whom we never laugh. this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. 6437 Second...
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Ethische und politische Freiheit

Julian Nida-Rümelin, Wilhelm Vossenkuhl - Philosophy - 1998 - 535 pages
...left in common for others. Of the Beginning of Political Societies 95. Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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Natural Rights and the New Republicanism

Michael P. Zuckert - Law - 1998 - 397 pages
...at greater length than the Declaration does, but it is the same point: "Men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this state and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent." That later human...
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The Dignity of Legislation

Jeremy Waldron, Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory Jeremy Waldron - Philosophy - 1999 - 206 pages
...of course, requires unanimity with regard to those who are taken to be bound by it: "Men being ... by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own consent" (n: 95). At...
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Health Care and the Ethics of Encounter: A Jewish Discussion of Social Justice

Laurie Zoloth - Religion - 1999 - 323 pages
...initial liberatory vision. 19. See Locke, Second Treatise, p. 54: 95. Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent. The only way where...
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The Social Contract Theorists: Critical Essays on Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau

Christopher W. Morris, Professor of Philosophy Christopher W Morris - Philosophy - 1999 - 244 pages
...(contract, trust) — can give another person or body political power over the rightholder:2 "Men being ... by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent" (II, 95). "No...
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Neither Separate Nor Equal: Women, Race, and Class in the South

Barbara E. Smith - Business & Economics - 1999 - 298 pages
...Second Treatise of Government ([Indianapolis: Hackett, 1980], p. 52): Men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. The only way...
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A History of Philosophy, Volume 5

Frederick Copleston - Philosophy - 1999 - 440 pages
...himself to, and incorporates with any government already made. . . .'3 'Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent. The only way whereby...
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Government by Fiat: The Retreat from Responsibility

Warwick Funnell - Political Science - 2001 - 238 pages
...reduced justly, therefore, if it was with the consent of the individual. Locke wrote how '[m]en being ... by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of his estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent, which is done by agreeing...
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