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" MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, -without his own consent. "
Jura Anglorum: The Rights of Englishmen - Page 34
by Francis Plowden - 1792 - 620 pages
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Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law

Brad R. Roth - Law - 2000 - 439 pages
...of Governme nt (Toronto: JM Dent & Sons, Ltd., 1982) 117, p. 164 (ch. VIII, para. 95): Men being ... by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent, which is done...
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The Liberal Tradition in Focus: Problems and New Perspectives

Joćo Carlos Espada, Marc F. Plattner, Adam Wolfson - Philosophy - 2000 - 165 pages
...political power must be found. He finds it in the consent of the people. Precisely because men are "by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent."4 Once other principles...
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The Global Divergence of Democracies

Larry Diamond, Marc F. Plattner - Political Science - 2001 - 381 pages
...political power must be found. He finds it in the consent of the people. Precisely because men are "by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent."4 Once other principles...
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Cultural Identity and the Nation-state

Professor of Philosophy and Political Science Carol C Gould, Carol Gould, Pasquale Paquino, Mohammad H. Faghfoory - Philosophy - 2001 - 155 pages
...(explicit or tacit)." John Locke, by contrast, is a genuine consensualist: Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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God, Locke, and Equality: Christian Foundations in Locke's Political Thought

Jeremy Waldron, Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory Jeremy Waldron - History - 2002 - 263 pages
...society; there he says that political power is established by consent: Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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Dismembering Lahui: A History of the Hawaiian Nation to 1887

Jonathan K. K. Osorio - History - 2002 - 320 pages
...and Harris, 26 March. 51. Locke, 1951, The Second Treatise of Civil Government, 421; "Men being ... by nature all free, equaL and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent." 52. Pacific Commercial...
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Locke and the Legislative Point of View: Toleration, Contested Principles ...

Alex Tuckness - Political Science - 2009 - 224 pages
...written history. The following passage is typical of Locke's approach. Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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The Second Treatise of Government: And, A Letter Concerning Toleration

John Locke - Political Science - 2002 - 153 pages
...i, sect. 10). Chapter VIII Of the Beginning of Political Societies 95. Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. The only way...
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The Case Against the Democratic State: An Essay in Cultural Criticism

Gordon Graham - Political Science - 2002 - 96 pages
...government such as that of John Locke. In his Second Treatise of Government Locke says Men being ... by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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Liberalism: Justice and reason

G. W. Smith - Liberalism - 2002 - 1725 pages
...modern thought, of the social contract and government by consent. III Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent. The only way...
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