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" MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, -without his own consent. "
Jura Anglorum: The Rights of Englishmen - Page 34
by Francis Plowden - 1792 - 620 pages
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Reason, Conflict and Power: Modern Political and Social Thought from 1688 to ...

Jim Rodgers - Political Science - 2003 - 141 pages
...follows: 1) The political thinker and writer John Locke has argued, among other things, that, "Men being by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of his estate and subjected to the political power of another without his consent." Would you agree with the...
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British Philosophy: Hobbes to Hume

Frederick Copleston - Philosophy - 2003 - 440 pages
...himself to, and incorporates with any government already made. . . .'* 'Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent. The only way whereby...
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The Principle of Fairness and Political Obligation

George Klosko - Philosophy - 2004 - 204 pages
...give up their freedom to political authorities only through consent: "Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent."35 Questions of...
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Renaissance and Revolt: Essays in the Intellectual and Social History of ...

John Hearsey McMillan Salmon - History - 2003 - 320 pages
...society in a passage which has no counterpart in the Essays, he writes: "Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another without his own consent."84 This is very...
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The Enlightenment: A Sourcebook and Reader

Paul Hyland, Olga Gomez, Francesca Greensides - History - 2003 - 467 pages
...II, ch.V, paras 27, 28 and 32) 'Of the Beginning of Political Societies' Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent. The only way whereby...
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Two Treatises of Government: And a Letter Concerning Toleration

John Locke - Political Science - 2003 - 358 pages
...affirm. CHAPTER VIII. Of the Beginning of Political Societies. 95. Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. The only way...
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A Declaration of Interdependence: Why America Should Join the World

Will Hutton - Business & Economics - 2003 - 319 pages
...using it for their own individual good. But this was only the beginning. "Men being, as has been said, by Nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this Estate, and subjected to the Political Power of another, without his own Consent," Locke had written....
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Free speech in classical antiquity : [Penn-Leiden Colloquium on Ancient ...

Ineke Sluiter, Ralph Mark Rosen - History - 2004 - 450 pages
...ruled is what distinguishes citizens or subjects from slaves; Locke, 2nd Treatise 95: 'Men being ... by nature all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of his estate and subjected to the political power of another without his own consent', cf. 96-99. the 1776...
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The Library of Original Sources: Volume VII: Era of Revolution

Oliver J. Thatcher - History - 2004 - 456 pages
...JOHN LOCKE POLITICAL SOCIETIES OF THE BEGINNING OF POLITICAL SOCIETIES MEN BEING, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent. The only way,...
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Confucian Democracy: A Deweyan Reconstruction

Sor-hoon Tan - Philosophy - 2003 - 258 pages
...central to the classical liberal theory of government. For John Locke, "men being, as has been said, by nature, all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to political power of another, without his own consent."81 On rare occasions,...
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