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" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. "
King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts - Page 5
by William Shakespeare - 1808 - 78 pages
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Shakespeare Stories II

Leon Garfield - Juvenile Fiction - 1995 - 284 pages
...and arrogant thing he had become. "Why, man," cried Cassius, seizing his friend by the arm, "he doth bestride the narrow world like a Colossus, and we...peep about to find ourselves dishonourable graves!" At the word 'dishonourable' Brutus flushed angrily. Honour was dearer to him than life itself, and...
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Giulio Cesare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 244 pages
...these applauses are For some new honours that are heaped on Caesar. CASSIUS Why, man, he doth bestrěde the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Lo fece. II torrente ruggiva e noi Lo aggredivamo con muscoli vigorosi, ricacciandolo Da una parte...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...('lugar', 'espacio'), que en tiempos de Shakespeare se pronunciaban igual. (N. del T.) 14. Cassius. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world / Like.../ To find ourselves dishonourable graves. / Men at some time are masters of their fates: / The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / But in ourselves,...
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Women, Nationalism, and the Romantic Stage: Theatre and Politics in Britain ...

Betsy Bolton - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 272 pages
...of the female Colossus. The echo of Julius Caesar here salaciously reframed Young's investigations: Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (1.2.135-38) The thought of what Young might have been "peeping at," walking around under the empress's...
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Julius Caesar

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - Drama - 2001 - 31 pages
...not want him to accept it. Disappointment was the reason for Caesar's sullen looks. Caesar's ambition Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Act i Sc ii 14 Caesar's comments on Cassius Let me have men about me that are fat; Sleek-headed men...
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Politics at the Turn of the Century

Symposium on Science, Reason, and Modern Democracy - Political Science - 2001 - 368 pages
...god, and Cassius is A wretched creature, and must bend his body If Caesar carelessly but nod on him. Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves.66 Shakespeare suggests, I believe, that both kinds of republican spirit are necessary...
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Orson Welles on Shakespeare: The W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre Playscripts

Orson Welles - Performing Arts - 2001 - 297 pages
...shout? I do believe that these applause are For some new honours that are heaped upon Caesar. CASSIUS Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about 1 14 Orson Welles on Shakespeare To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters...
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Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 228 pages
...harbours a keen resentment against his victim's overwhelming grandeur Why, man, he doth bestride the petty world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under...legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable grave (tu) - he is also inspired by sternly unselfish motives; while Brutus, who had really loved Caesar,...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1989 - 1280 pages
...shout! I do believe that these applauses are For some new honours that are heapt on Cassar. CASSIUS. es, plotted, KING RICHARD THE SECOND IV. I. 131-183...my strong correction. — As I intend to thrive in some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves,...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - Business & Economics - 2002 - 320 pages
...them all, could be tempted by power. Cassius stirs up Brutus's indignation toward Caesar by saying: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. JULIUS CAESAR (1.2, 133-36) Cassius continues to work on Brutus's ambition: Men at some time are masters...
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