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" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. "
King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts - Page 5
by William Shakespeare - 1808 - 78 pages
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Take the Rich Off Welfare

Mark Zepezauer - Business & Economics - 2004 - 183 pages
...Two: Big Business Breaks FOOP STAMPS Tax Avoidance by Transnationals ($137.2 billion a year) UUhy. man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a colossus,...under his huge legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves."1 Cassius's description of Caesar is hard to beat for giving the flavor of how...
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In The Footsteps of Churchill

Richard Holmes - Biography & Autobiography - 2009 - 376 pages
...the Americans.8 The words Shakespeare put in the mouth of thoroughly modern Cassius spring to mind: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like...about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fate: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves...
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The Problem Plays of Shakespeare: A Study of Julius Caesar, Measure for ...

Ernest Schanzer - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 196 pages
...Caesar's greatness dwarfs his own achievements, and makes it impossible for him to gain glory and renown. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (1.2.135-8) 'Honour', a word which occupies the same central position in this play as does 'honesty'...
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Shakespeare's Early Tragedies

Nicholas Brooke - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 232 pages
...again on the shouts off-stage - and Cassius completes his peroration with a superbly grotesque image: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (133-6) The movement from the Marlowan 'Like a Colossus' to the physical particularity of 'huge legs'...
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Exploring 1 & 2 Thessalonians: An Expository Commentary

John Phillips - Religion - 2005 - 240 pages
...the plot to murder Julius Caesar, Shakespeare has Cassius complain to Brutus, Caesar's close friend: Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. But Caesar, as ambitious as he was, was nothing compared with what the Antichrist...
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Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 239 pages
...shout! I do believe that these applauses are 140 For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar. CASSIUS Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. 145 Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not...
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Architecture, Town Planning and Community: Selected Writings and Public ...

Cecil Scott Burgess - Architecture - 2005 - 338 pages
...to realise the vigour of old Rome, we are reminded of Cassius' description of Julius Caesar He doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus, and we...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. We are a great people and live in a great time, but let us remember ' there have been others. There...
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Shakespeare: The Golfer's Companion

Syd Pritchard - Humor - 2005 - 147 pages
...achieve greatness, And some have greatness thrust upon 'em. [Twelfth Night II v 130] Captain titanic Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...petty men walk under his huge legs And peep about Tojind ourselves dishonourable graves. [Julius Caesar I ii 1 34] Captain pretentious Dressed in a little...
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Shakespeare's Sports Canon

Chris Coculuzzi, William Shakespeare, Matt Toner - Sports - 2005 - 277 pages
...BRUTUS You speak a'th'people, as if you were a God, To punish; Not a man, of their Infirmity. CASSIUS Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable Graves. BRUTUS He would be crown'd: How that might change his nature, there's the question. It is the bright...
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The Best-loved Plays of Shakespeare

Jennifer Mulherin, William Shakespeare, Abigail Frost - English literature - 2004 - 160 pages
...warning and dismisses the fortune teller. 'He is a dreamer; let us leave him; pass.' Caesar's ambition Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Act i Sc ii As the procession moves on, two Roman noblemen linger behind. One is Brutus, whose ancestors...
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