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" We confess ourselves to be so far from recanting, or declining to vindicate the assembling of ourselves, to preach, pray, or worship the eternal, holy, just God, that we declare to all the world, that we do believe it to be our indispensable duty to meet... "
Lives of the Illustrious: (the Biographical Magazine). - Page 180
1855
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The Quakers: an international history

John Cunningham - 1868
...crowd, but that they could not hear what he said. " We confess ourselves," said Penn, " to be so far from recanting or declining to vindicate the assembling of ourselves to preach and worship the Eternal God, that we declare to all the world that we believe it to be our indispensable...
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History of William Penn, Founder of Pennsylvania, Volume 2

William Hepworth Dixon - England - 1872 - 363 pages
...silence be commanded." ' Silence in the court !' said the crier. Penn : ' We confess ourselves so far from recanting or declining to vindicate the assembling of ourselves to preach, to pray, or worship God, that we declare to all the world, we believe it to be our indispensable duty...
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The History of Pennsylvania from the Earliest Discovery to the Present Time ...

William Mason Cornell - Pennsylvania - 1876 - 575 pages
...place and time mentioned. Their object in being there was to worship God. " ' We are so far,' says he, ' from recanting, or declining to vindicate the...from reverencing and adoring our God who made us.' These words were scarcely pronounced, when one of the sheriffs exclaimed that he was not there for...
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Friends in the Seventeenth Century

Charles Evans - Society of Friends - 1876 - 668 pages
...altogether inconclusive, but William Penn boldly said to the Court, " We confess ourselves to be so far from recanting or declining to vindicate, the assembling...it to be our indispensable duty to meet incessantly on so good an account; nor shall all the powers upon earth be able to divert us from reverencing and...
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Friends in the Seventeenth Century

Charles Evans - Quakers - 1876 - 668 pages
...altogether inconclusive, but William Penn boldly said to the Court, " We confess ourselves to be so far from recanting or declining to vindicate the assembling...do believe it to be our indispensable duty to meet incessantlv on so good an account; nor shall all the powers upon earth be able to divert us from reverencing...
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The Penns & Peningtons of the Seventeenth Century: In Their Domestic and ...

Maria Webb - 1877 - 446 pages
...far from recanting, or declining to vindicate the assembling ourselves to preach, pray, or worship God, that we declare to all the world, that we do...all the powers upon earth be able to divert us from thus reverencing and adoring our God who made us. " Slieriff Brown. — You are not here for worshipping...
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Select Historical Memoirs of the Religious Society of Friends, Commonly ...

William Hodgson - Quakers - 1881 - 412 pages
...after requesting silence in the court, addressed them thus : " We confess ourselves to be so far from declining to vindicate the assembling of ourselves,...from reverencing and adoring our God, who made us." One of the sheriffs told him he was not there for worshipping God, but for breaking the law ; though...
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Passages from the Life and Writings of William Penn, Collected by the Editor ...

William Penn - 1882 - 512 pages
...acknowledged that both he and his friend were present at the place and time mentioned. "We are so far," says he, " from recanting, or declining to vindicate the...from reverencing and adoring our God, who made us." These words were scarcely pronounced when Brown, one of the sheriffs, exclaimed that he was not there...
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Passages from the Life and Writings of William Penn

Thomas Pym Cope - Pennsylvania - 1882 - 512 pages
...acknowledged that both he and his friend were present at the place and time mentioned. "We are so far,1' says he, " from recanting, or declining to vindicate the...from reverencing and adoring our God, who made us." These words were scarcely pronounced when Brown, one of the sheriff-s, exclaimed that he was not there...
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William Penn, the Founder of Pennsylvania

John Stoughton - 1882 - 364 pages
...assembling of ourselves to preach, to pray, or worship God, — that we declare to all the world, that we believe it to be our indispensable duty to meet incessantly...shall all the powers upon earth be able to divert us." " You are not here," said one of the sheriffs, " for worshipping God, but for breaking the laws." Here...
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