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" And when he was asked the reason of so committing this trust, he answered to this effect : — that there was no absolute certainty in human affairs ; but, for his part, he found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree... "
The Literary chronicle and weekly review - Page 285
1820
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The great schools of England

Howard Staunton - Endowed public schools (Great Britain) - 1865 - 517 pages
...no absolute certaintv in human affairs, but, for his part, he found less corruption in such a bodv of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind." The fellowship thus highly spoken of has more to answer for than any ordinary board of school governors,...
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The American Journal of Education, Volume 16

Henry Barnard - Education - 1866
...reputation. And when he was asked the reason of so committing this trust, he answered to tliis effect: That there was no absolute certainty in human affairs, but for his part he found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind....
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The Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review, Volume 38

Charles Hodge, Lyman Hotchkiss Atwater - Bible - 1866
...civic companies of London, viz., the Mercers. When asked his reason, he is reported to have said, " That there was no absolute certainty in human affairs, but, for his part, he found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind."...
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The history of Tonbridge school, from its foundation in 1553

Septimus Rivington - 1869
...they were J . r , Because no absolute certainty in human affairs, but, for his part, he less liable found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any propriate other order or degree of mankind." than ^y The following ia a list of the Governours of the...
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London: Its Celebrated Characters and Remarkable Places, Volume 3

John Heneage Jesse - London (England) - 1871
...noble charity. " There is no absolute certainty," he replied, "in human affairs; but for my part I have found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or body of mankind." The present building was erected in 1S23. On the south side of St. Paul's Cathedral...
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American Journal of Education, Volume 28

Education - 1878
...reputation. And when he was asked the reason of so committing this trust, he answered to this effect: That there was no absolute certainty in human affairs, but for his part be found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of^mankind....
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Old and new London: a narrative of its history, its people and its places ...

George Walter Thornbury - 1880
...foundation, he answered, " that there was no absolute certainty in human alTairs, but, for his part, he found less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind." Erasmus, after describing the foundation and the school, which he calls " a magnificent structure,...
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The Pauline, Volume 1, Issue 2

St. Paul's School (London, England) - 1882
..."that there was no certainty in human affairs, but that in his opinion there was less probability of corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind." The foundation was completed in AD 1512, for 153 children to be taught free (being the number of the miraculous...
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Walford's Antiquarian Magazine and Bibliographical Review, Volume 8

George W. Redway, Edward Walford - Archaeology - 1885
...made answer to the effect that there was no absolute certainty in human affairs, but that for his part he found less corruption in such a body of citizens •than in any order or degree of mankind. Fuller quaintly vindicates this choice in his Church History : at this...
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All the Year Round, Volume 31; Volume 51

English literature - 1883
...bishop, or dean and chapter, but to married laymen ; there being no certainty in anything human, but less corruption in such a body of citizens than in any other order or degree of mankind." He, and Lily, and Erasmus wrote the Paul's Accidence ; Lily, who after leaving Oxford had gone a pilgrimage...
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