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" The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends, and (as it were)... "
The American Whig Review - Page 158
1848
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Specimens of Modern English Literary Criticism

William Tenney Brewster - English literature - 1907 - 379 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Specimens of Modern English Literary Criticism

William Tenney Brewster - English literature - 1907 - 379 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Biographia Literaria, Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Aesthetics - 1907
...described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its 10 faculties to each other, according to their relative...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Biographia Literaria, Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Aesthetics - 1907
...modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. / The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole | soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its1 ! faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone...
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Coleridge's Literary Criticism

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1908 - 266 pages
...Shakespearian age in poetry <™- 1 own generaLITERARY CRITICISM POETRY THE poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of Imagination. This power, first put in action...
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English Prose and Poetry (1137-1892).

John Matthews Manly - English literature - 1916 - 792 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal says the fool ; For all we have power to see is a...And the ear of man cannot hear, and the eye of man to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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English Prose and Poetry (1137-1892)

John Matthews Manly - English literature - 1916 - 792 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal mbamarca's side to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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A Book of English Literature, Selected and Ed, Volume 2

Franklyn Bliss Snyder - English literature - 1916 - 889 pages
...modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in [340 ideal n or view. So much is true of all art, which therefore...of the literary art, as being of all the arts most to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put [350 in action...
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English Poetry and Prose of the Romantic Movement: Selected and Ed., with ...

George Benjamin Woods - England - 1916 - 1432 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal salfying forth With a huge wallet o'er my shoulders...far-distant wood, a figure quaint,. Tricked out in proud d 1 The free spirit ooght to be urged onward. Satyric p. 63. * See Poc s The Poetic Principle, In which...
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Readings in English Prose of the Nineteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - English prose literature - 1917 - 695 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the \poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively" appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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