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" The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends, and (as it were)... "
The American Whig Review - Page 158
1848
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Encyclopedia of Rhetoric and Composition: Communication from Ancient Times ...

Theresa Enos, Theresa Jarnigan Enos - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1996 - 803 pages
..."struggles" to "umfy": "The poet hrings the whole soul of man into activity, with the suhordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and digmty." Ideally, the poet and statesman address the "all in each" of all persons. The "Essays on Method"...
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The Theory of Inspiration: Composition as a Crisis of Subjectivity in ...

Timothy Clark - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 312 pages
...composition the poet thus becomes a rare instance of unalienated humanity: 'The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...other, according to their relative worth and dignity' (II, p. 16). Inspiration also retains its seeming effect of something for nothing: 'the Effort required...
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The Possibilities of Society: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and the Sociological ...

Regina Hewitt - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 231 pages
...when he quotes Schiller and Schelling — as he does, for example, in defining the poet as one who "brings the whole soul of man into activity, with...other, according to their relative worth and dignity" (Works 7: 2.15-16; Engell's and Bate's n. 1 on p. 16 gives the original phrases). Detailing the thought...
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Theory as Practice: A Critical Anthology of Early German Romantic Writings

Jochen Schulte-Sasse, Haynes Horne - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 479 pages
...definitively and affirmatively than the Romantic Coleridge, according to whom the poetic genius . . . brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties into each other, according to their relative worth of dignity. He diffuses a tone, and spirit of unity,...
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Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory

Kathryn Sutherland, Professor of Bibliography and Textual Criticism Kathryn Sutherland - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1997 - 245 pages
...53-74. 31. 'The poet. described in ideal perfection. brings the whole soul of man into activity, . . . He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity. that blends. and (as it werel fuses earh into each. by that synthetic and magical power. to which I would exclusively appropriate...
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Unity in Diversity Revisited?: British Literature and Culture in the 1990s

Barbara Korte, Klaus Peter Müller - English literature - 1998 - 274 pages
...imagination. Thus, imagination becomes the sure sign of an ideal poet: The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Text: An Interdisciplinary Annual of Textual Studies, Volume 10

W. Speed Hill - Literary Collections - 1998 - 448 pages
...against 18 "The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity. , . . He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination," Btographia Literaria, chap, xiv,...
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Taming the Chaos: English Poetic Diction Theory Since the Renaissance

Emerson R. Marks - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 413 pages
...of that activity, a process which, "in ideal perfection," engages the whole human psyche. The poet diffuses a tone, and spirit of unity, that blends,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Textual Transgressions: Essays Toward the Construction of a Biobibliography

David C. Greetham, Distinguished Professor David Greetham - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 602 pages
...Representations of Print Culture in the Copyright Debate of i 837-i 842," Victorian Studies 23(i 994): (as it were) fuses each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination" (Btographia Literaria i4). The implications...
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Romantic Aversions: Aftermaths of Classicism in Wordsworth and Coleridge

Douglas Kneale - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 227 pages
...intertextual thread running through this passage: Coleridge's previous sentence states that the poet "diffuses a tone, and spirit of unity, that blends,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination" (Coleridge's emphasis). I am alerted...
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