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" The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends, and (as it were)... "
The American Whig Review - Page 158
1848
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Semiotics of Language, Literature, and Culture

Vennelaṇṭi Prakāśam - Culture - 1999 - 168 pages
...affected more than men by absent things as if they were present," has brought the "whole soul" of his into activity, "with the subordination of its faculties...other according to their relative worth and dignity." The result has been quite rewarding for the poet. These poems are an "overflow of powerful feelings"...
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Coleridge and the Uses of Division

Fellow and Tutor Balliol College Lecturer English Faculty Seamus Perry, Seamus (Lecturer in English Literature Perry, Lecturer in English Literature University of Glasgow), Seamus Perry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 303 pages
...'each Thing has a Life of it's [sic] own, & yet they are all one Life' [Lerters, II:866): the poet -diffuses a tone, and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each' (Biographia, II:16). It is only where the processes of the diffused imagination are 'rendered impossible'...
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The Green Studies Reader: From Romanticism to Ecocriticism

Laurence Coupe - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 315 pages
...all its materials ready made from the law of association. . . . . . . The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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The Green Studies Reader: From Romanticism to Ecocriticism

Laurence Coupe - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 315 pages
...all its materials ready made from the law of association. . . . . . . The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Cultural Metaphors: Readings, Research Translations, and Commentary

Martin J. Gannon - Business & Economics - 2001 - 262 pages
...conclusion than the following excerpt from Coleridge. In his Bioffraphia Ltteraria he writes: The poet . . . brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the...their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone, a spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) ruses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical...
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Das Schöpferische in der Literatur: Theorien der dichterischen Phantasie

András Horn - Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) - 2000 - 119 pages
...gleichen geistigen Inhalt zu vermitteln und dadurch künstlerische Einheit zu stiften: „He [the poet] diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends and...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power [...] reveals itself...
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Ethics and Dialogue: In the Works of Levinas, Bakhtin, Mandelʹshtam, and Celan

Michael Eskin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic Languages Michael Eskin - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 294 pages
...synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination [,] brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other [and] diffuses a spirit of unity' (ibid.), Mandel'shtam's synthetic poet has nothing 'magical' about...
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Sight & Sound

Frank Mehring - Nature in literature - 2001 - 189 pages
...äußert sich Coleridge in einer für Emerson entscheidenden Passage: The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power of which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power [...] reveals istself...
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British Romanticism and the Science of the Mind

Alan Richardson - Literary Criticism - 2001
...writings, perhaps most famously in his description of poetic creation. "The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) Juses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated...
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The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry

John Sitter - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 298 pages
...for Dennis poetry provides for the "Satisfaction of the whole Man together," for Coleridge the poet "brings the whole soul of man into activity, with...other, according to their relative worth and dignity" (Biographia Literaria, ch. 14). It is a short step theoretically from Dennis's satisfaction of the...
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