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" The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends, and (as it were)... "
The American Whig Review - Page 158
1848
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Theological Aesthetics: A Reader

Gesa Elsbeth Thiessen - Religion - 2005 - 400 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. This power, first put in action...
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Shakespeare and the Ideal of Love

Jill Line - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 192 pages
...poet brings the diffuse parts of the soul into unity through the power of the imagination: He. . . brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which I would exclusively appropriate the name of Imagination.6 As Prospero, with the help of Ariel,...
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The Scholar's Art: Literary Studies in a Managed World

Jerome J. McGann - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 239 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. A poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...tone, and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were)/ttses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated...
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Aesthetic Democracy

Thomas Docherty - Philosophy - 2006 - 185 pages
...Literaria, chapter 14, where Coleridge describes the condition of being a poet: The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...diffuses a tone and spirit of unity that blends and fuses . . . each into each, by that synthetic and magical power to which we have exclusively appropriated...
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Reforming Liberalism: J.S. Mill's Use of Ancient, Religious, Liberal, and ...

Robert Devigne - Philosophy - 2008 - 320 pages
...life, shaping and transforming it into one harmonious, beautiful entity. "The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each other, according to their relative worth and dignity."38 In true Platonic fashion, Coleridge argued it is illuminating to evaluate all particular...
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Literary Couplings: Writing Couples, Collaborators, and the Construction of ...

Marjorie Stone, Judith Thompson - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 373 pages
...and modifies the images, thoughts, and emotions of the poet's own mind. The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination. (BL, 2:15- 16) What this famous...
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Romanticism After Auschwitz

Sara Emilie Guyer - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 364 pages
...that the answer to the one is involved in the solution of the other. . . . The poet described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...other, according to their relative worth and dignity" (2: 15-16). Wordsworth's account of the poet, which I reproduce only in part, quickly renders the "natural"...
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From Nature to Experience: The American Search for Cultural Authority

Roger Lundin - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 263 pages
...of poetry, that "the poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity He diffuses a tone, and spirit of unity, that blends,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination."30 Coleridge saw his theory of the...
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Guy Davenport: Postmodernism and After

Andre Furlani - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 247 pages
...whole of them" (quoted in Gardner 1978, 14). In the Biographia Literaria Coleridge claims that the poet "diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends,...each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination . . . [Imagination] forms all into...
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Romantic Prose Fiction

Gerald Ernest Paul Gillespie, Manfred Engel, Bernard Dieterle - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 733 pages
...supposed to be common among mankind« (Wordsworth 1968, 255 f.). Coleridge: »The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity,...other, according to their relative worth and dignity« (Coleridge 1983, 15 f.). Shelley: »But poets [ . . . ] are not only the authors of language and Music,...
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