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" How should I your true love know From another one ? By his cockle hat and staff, And his sandal shoon. "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 399
1833
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Chapters on the Common Things of the Sea-side

Anne Pratt - Botany - 1850 - 345 pages
...front of the hat, is frequently adverted to by our older writers. Thus we have Ophelia's song : — " How should I your true love know From another one ? By his cockle-hat and staff, And by his sandal shoon." And in that quaint old poem of Sir Walter Raleigh's,...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...trifle. Re-enter HORATIO, with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. Hovv now, Ophelia ? Oph. How should I your true love know,...what imports. this song? Oph. Say you ? nay ; 'pray you, mark. He is dead and gone, lady, [Sings. He is dead and gone ; At his head a grass-green turf,...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1851
...jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. Re-enter HOBATIO with OPHELIA. Oph. \Vhere is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. How now,...By his cockle hat and staff, And his sandal shoon ? [Singin.?. Queen. Alas, sweet lady, what imports this song ? Oph. Say you ? nay, pray you, mark....
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...and more by Mr. Nares, in his Glossary. " Each toy " is each trifle. Re-enter HORATIO, with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen....How now, Ophelia ? Oph. How should I your true love knoiv, From another one f By his cockle hat and staff ] And his sandal shoon.1 [Singing. Queen. Alas,...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself, in fearing to be spilt. Re-enter HORATIO with OPHELIA'. OPH. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? QUEEN. How now, Ophelia? OPH. [Sings.] How should I your true love know From another one ? By his eoekle hat and staff, And his sandal...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. Re-enter HORATIO, with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. How now, Ophelia ? Oph. Sow should I your true love know, From another one f By his cockle hat and staff, And his sandal shoon....
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...heartless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. Be-enter IIORATIO with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. How now, Ophelia ? Oph. How should I your true lone know From another one ? By his rookie hat and staff, And his sandal shoon 1 [Singing. Queen.^...
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A rudimentary treatise on the philosophy of grammar

Edward Meyrick Goulburn - 1852
...old form is used by Sbakspere, and the maintenance of it is essential to one of Ophelia's rhymes — Oph. How should I your true love know From another one? By his cockle-hat and staff, And his sandal shoon. The above is a question respecting the Grammatical Affection...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...heartless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. Re-enter HoEATlO with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. How now, Ophelia ? Oph. Horn should I your true love know From another one ? By his cockle hat and staff, And his sandal shoon...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt. Re-enter HORATIO, with OPHELIA. Oph. Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark ? Queen. How now, Ophelia? OPHELIA sinys. How should I your true love know From another one ? By his cockle-hat and staff, And...
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